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SMBSUW^ 54 - 







Board of Selectmen: 

Seated (1-r) David Player, Jr., Chairman William E. George, 

James R. Engel 
Standing (1-r) Thomas A. Elliott, Robert H. Leet 



Cover: Photo by Rick Goodwin/North Shore Weeklies, Inc. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
TOWN OF IPSWICH 

1987 



NOTES 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
MASSACHUSETTS 

1987 ANNUAL REPORT 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Roster of Town Officials and Committees 2 

April 06, 1987 Annual Town Meeting 5 

Operating Budget 6 

September 28, 1987 Special Town Meeting 32 

Board of Sel ectmen 39 

Town Manager 39 

Assessor ' s Office 40 

Building Inspector 41 

Cemeteries, Parks and Buildings Department 41 

Civi 1 Defense 42 

Commuter Rai 1 Commi ttee 43 

Conservation Commission 44 

Dog and Animal Control Officer 44 

Fire Department 45 

Hall-Haskell House Standing Committee 46 

Harbormaster 46 

Health Department 47 

Historical Commission 48 

Housing Authority 49 

Ipswich Arts Council 50 

Library 51 

Master Plan Commission c 52 

Planning Board 52 

Pol i ce Department , 53 

Public Works Department 54 

Recreation-Youth Department 56 

School Commi ttee 57 

Superi ntendent of School s 58 

Hi gh School 58 

Ralph C. Whipple Memorial School 59 

Paul F. Doyon Memorial School 60 

Winthrop School 61 

Department of Special Services 61 

Shellfish Department 63 

Town Clerk 64 

Town Counsel 64 

Treasurer-Collector 65 

Water/Sewer Departments 65 

Whittier Regional High School 67 

Zoning Board of Appeals 67 

Government Study Commi ttee 68 

Revenue Sharing/Handicapped Regulations 68 

Financial Statement-Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1987 69 



-1- 



1987 ROSTER OF TOWN OFFICIALS AND COMMITTEES 



E CONSTABLE 
Louis Merry 

E HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Walter Ziemlak, Ch 
Stanley Eustace 
Sarah S. O'Connor 
Arthur Weagle 
Loretta Dietch/State 

E SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Jeffrey Simon 
Cynthia Quinn 
David Pauley 
Margot Sherwood 
Carl Soderland 
Norman Sheppard 
Lawrence E. Seidler 

E TOWN MODERATOR 
A. James Grimes 



ELEC 


FED 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 




1988 


E2 


Elected At Town Meeting 






Walter J. Pojasek 


1990 






George Jewell 


1988 


1991 




Constance Surpitski 


1989 


1990 


03 


Appointed By Moderator 




1989 




William Craft, Ch 


1988 


1988 




Clarence S. Dupray 


1990 


1991 




Alice Shurcliff 


1989 




S 


Appointed By Selectmen 








John Markos 


1990 


1989 




Allen G. Swan 


1988 


1989 




James D. Smyth 


1989 


1990 








1988 


E 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




1988 




William E. George, Ch 


1988 


1990 




Robert H. Leet 


1990 


1990 




James R. Engel 


1990 






David S. Player, Jr. 


1989 






Thomas A. Elliott 


1989 



SI ACCOUNTANT 
Barry Boyce 

Ml ASSESSOR 

Frank J. Ragonese 

Ml BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Joseph Ferruzzi 

Ml CEMETERY/PARKS SUPERINTENDENT 
James E. Graff urn 

Ml DOG OFFICER/ANIMAL INSPECTOR 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

Ml ENGINEER 

James E. Chase 

Ml FIRE CHIEF 

Edwin R. Emerson 

Ml HARBORMASTER 

Armand R. Bouillette 

Ml HEALTH AGENT 
Domenic Badolato 

Ml LIBRARIAN 
Eleanor Gaunt 

Ml TOWN PLANNER 
Elizabeth Ware 



1988 

APPOINTED ADMINISTRATION 

Ml POLICE CHIEF 

Armand R. Brouillette 



Ml PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR 
Armand T. Michaud 

Ml RECREATION DIRECTOR 
Elizabeth Dorman 

Ml SHELLFISH CONSTABLE 
Philip Kent 

6 SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

Ml TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

Ml TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles C. Dalton 

S TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

SI TREASURER/COLLECTOR 
George C. Mourikas 

Ml DEPUTY COLLECTOR 
William Handren 



-2- 



M BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Frank J. Ragonese 
John D. Heaphy 
John Moberger 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 

S CATV COMMITTEE 
1990 George E. Howe 
1989 Glenn Bayley 
1988 



1988 
1988 



M CEMETERY & PARKS COMMISSION 
S. Joseph Favalora, Ch 
Nicholas Markos 
Gordon C. Player 

M CIVIL DEFENSE 

David Clements, Dir 
John T. Clogston, Asst 

S COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Dorcas Rice 
Jim Berry, Ch 
Vivian Endicott 
Joseph Carl in 
William Varrell 
James McC. Hayward 
Anne Teele 

MS CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Ch 
Robert B. Porter 
George E. Hovey 
David Crestin 
James Berry 
Richard A. Nylen, Jr. 
William Barton 



COUNCIL ON AGING 
Winfred Hardy, Ch 
Gertrude Emery 
Helen Drenth 
Rita Poirier 
Anthony Christopher 
Rev. John H. Pressey 
Marion Rogers 

FAIR HOUSING COMMITTEE 
Natalie Gaynor, Ch 
Tone Kenney 
Sara O'Connor 
Marion Middlebrooks 



GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Peter J. Dziadose 
Kris Muench 
Carol Kingston 
Douglas Laterowicz 



M5 



1988 


Mary P. Conley, Ch 


1988 


1990 


Susan Nelson 


1990 


1989 


Faith Bryan 


1990 




George R. Mathey 


1990 




Alice Keenan 


1988 


1988 


Ruthanne Rogers 


1988 


1988 


Robert St. George 


1989 




S INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 


FINANCING 


1988 


AUTHORITY 




1988 


George E. Howe, Ch 


1991 


1988 


James C. Lahar 


1992 


1988 


Richard Emery 


1989 


1988 


Loretta Dietch 


1990 


1988 


Susan C. Hubbard 


1988 


1988 


S IPSWICH ARTS COUNCIL 




1990 


Marion Swan, Ch 


1989 


1990 


Mary Pollak 


1989 


1990 


Judith Fouser 


1989 


1988 


Nancy Warner 


1989 


1988 


Mary Weatherall 


1989 


1989 


Jane E. Reiman 


1989 


1989 


Harry Zelzter 
S LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


1988 




Crocker Snow, Sr., Ch 


1989 




Donald M. Greenough 


1990 


1989 


Hubert Johnson 


1990 


1990 


Lawrence Pszenny 


1990 


1990 


Martha Gillespie 


1988 


1988 


Virginia Jackson 


1988 


1988 


Phyllis E. Bruce 


1988 


1989 


Louise Sweetser 


1989 


1989 


L. Emerson Tuttle 
MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 


1989 


1988 


Richard A. Nylen, Jr., 


Ch 1988 


1988 


Charles J. Wayne 


1988 


1988 


Benjamin Fierro, III 


1988 


1988 


James M. Barney 


1988 




Patrick J. McNally 


1988 




Richard F. Howard 


1988 




James Theodosopoulos 


1988 


1988 


Douglas Denninger 


1988 


1988 


Costos Tsoutsouras 


1988 


1988 


Ruthanne Rogers 


1988 


1988 


George R. Mathey 


1988 



-3- 



APPOINTED BOARDS AND COMMITTEES 



03 HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 

Vivian Endicott, Ch 1988 

Theresa Stephens 1988 

Helen M. Burr 1988 

Alice Keenan 1988 

Cathleen R. McGinley 1988 

M BOARD OF HEALTH 

David Carleton, Ch 1990 

Kenneth L. Zinn, M.D. 1988 

Susan C. Hubbard 1989 



M PLANNING BOARD 
William E. Bingham 
Stanley Bornstein 
Patrick J. McNally 
Ernest Jerrett 
John Logan 



1991 
1992 
1988 
1989 
1990 



M RECREATION COMMISSION 

Kenneth Spellman, Ch 1988 

Mark J. Perrone 1990 

Timothy Bishop 1988 

Barry W. Hopping 1990 

Stephen G. Markos 1989 

Linda M. Murphy 1989 

James W. Foley 1990 

S REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Ann M. Reynolds 1988 

Barbara Kasuba 1990 

Peter M. Ross 1989 

Ml Isobel N. Coulombe, Clerk 1988 

S SHELLFISH ADVISORY BOARD 

Thomas Dorman, Ch 1988 

Melvin A. Bowen 1988 

Alice H. Thanos 1988 

Andrew Gianakakis 1988 

Forrest W. MacGilvary 1988 

Nancy Havener 1988 

Anthony Christopher 1988 

S TRUST FUND COMMISSIONERS 

Sturgis P. Papagiotis 1999 

Donald Greenough 1988 

S WATER SUPPLY COMMITTEE 

James Engel, Ch 1988 

Robert 0. Butcher 1988 

Robert Comeau 1988 

Scott Greeley 1988 

Gerald Priestman 1988 

Leonard Heurlin 1988 

S WATERWAYS ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

George C. Scott, Jr., Ch 1988 

Jane Rieman 1988 

William A. Barton 1988 

Marc C. Silverman 1988 

Gary J. Hamilton 1988 



S ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Ch 1992 

David Levesque 1988 

William J. Murphy 1989 

Daniel B. Lunt, Jr. 1990 

Douglas Denninger 1991 

John R. Verani, Associate 1988 

Joseph R. Petranek " 1988 



M BELL RINGER 

Stanley Eustace 1988 

M GAS INSPECTOR 

A.N.D. Hyde C.S. 

M PARKING CLERK 

William Handren 1988 

M PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

A.N.D. Hyde C.S. 

M ALTERNATE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
David W. French C.S. 

M SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

Normand J. Bedard 1988 

M WIRING INSPECTOR 

Raymond Budzianowski 1988 

APPOINTMENT LEGEND 

E Elected 

S Appointed By Board of Selectmen 

M Appointed By Town Manager 

Other 

1 Supervised By Town Manager 

2 Elected At Town Meeting 

3 Appointed By Moderator 

4 General Laws 

5 Confirmed By Board of Selectmen 

6 Appointed By School Committee 



-4- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Ipswich High School April 06, 1987 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town 

affairs, to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL, in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE 

SIXTH DAY OF APRIL, 1987, at 7:30 o'clock in the evening, then and there to 

act on the following articles, viz: 

At 7:30 p.m., Moderator James Grimes announced that there were only 145 voters 
present and asked that the Opening be postponed; it was moved, seconded and so 
voted. 

At 8:00 p.m., there still was no quorum (350 voters) present; and it was moved, 
seconded, and voted that the Meeting be postponed until 8:30. At 8:30 p.m., with 
still no quorum but only a few needed, the Moderator asked for a sense of the 
Meeting. It was decided to. wait. 

At 8:39, the Moderator announced that there were 358 voters present, and called 
the Meeting to order. The Pledge of Allegiance was led by retiring School Com- 
mittee Chairman Marjorie Robie, followed by a moment of silence for the late 
George C. Mourikas and Daniel B. Lunt. The final count was 365. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted unanimously to admit non-voters to view the 
proceedings. 

Tellers appointed by the Moderator were: Janet Foote, Bruce Cutler, Raymond 
Barrows, Joanne Parker, and Vera Cobb. 

ARTICLE 1 

To fix the salary and compensation of all elected Town Officers. 

Selectman Chairman David S. Player, Jr., moved that the salary and compensation 
for all elected Town Officers be approved as presented in the Budget. Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To choose the following officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator for 
one (1) year; Two (2) Selectmen for three (3) years; and Three (3) Members of the 
School Committee for three (3) years. 

The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respective polling places 
as follows: Precinct 1 Agawam Village Recreation Hall, County Road; Precinct 2 
Winthrop School, Central Street; Precinct 3 Ipswich High School, High Street; 
Precinct '4 Whittier Manor Recreation Hall, Caroline Avenue; on Monday April 13, 
1987. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m.; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Thomas A. Elliott moved that the Town vote to choose the following 
officers, viz: Constable for one (1) year; Moderator for one (1) year; Two (2) 
Selectmen for three (3) years, and Three (3) Members of the School Committee for 

-5- 



three (3) years. The above officers to be voted on one ballot at their respec- 
tive polling places as follows: Precinct 1, Agawam Village Recreation Hall, 
County Road; Precinct 2, Winthrop School, Central Street; Precinct 3, Ipswich 
High School, High Street; Precinct 4, Whittier Manor Recreation Hall, Caroline 
Avenue; on Monday, April 13, 1987. The polls shall open at 10:00 a.m. and close 
at 8:00 p.m. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 3 

To choose one (1) Member of the Finance Committee for three (3) years. 

Selectman William E. George moved that the Town Meeting elect Walter Pojasek as 
a member of the Finance Committee for a term of three years. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously, with Chairman William 
Craft stating that Mr. Pojasek as been a real asset to the Committee. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To hear and act upon the report of the Finance Committee relative to the munici- 
pal budget and to raise, appropriate, and transfer money for the ensuing year, 
including the compensation of elected Town Officers, and to authorize the expen- 
diture of a sum of monies from the Federal General Revenue Sharing account for 
the aforementioned purposes; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Finance Committee Chairman William Craft noted changes in the Budget as it 
appeared in the Finance Committee Report. He then moved that the Town vote to 
raise and appropriate the sum of $5,963,658 for the purposes indicated in the 
FY88 Municipal Operating Budget as presented in the Finance Committee Report, 
pages 14 - 19. He further moved that: 

For the Municipal Operating Budget of $5,963,658, the Town 

Transfer from Available Funds: 

Surplus Revenue (Free Cash) $1,204,152 

Sewer Rents & Unreserved Fund Balance 260,822 

Sewer Betterments 23,156 

Water Pollution Control 3,270 

Library Aid 5,579 

Cemetery Perpetual Care 30,992 

Cemetery Flower Fund 2,839 

Overlay Surplus to Reserve fund 45,000 

Overlay Surplus: Revaluation Contract(s) 200,000 
Thus the total transferred from available funds is $1,775,810 

Leaving a Net to be Raised and Assessed of $4,187,848 



003 SELECTMEN: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenses 

Total 



OPERATING BUDGET 






GENERAL GOVERNMENT 








FY87 


FY88 


FY85 FY86 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended Expended 


priated 


mended 


$ 12,931 $ 11,301 


$ 14,150 $ 


13,643 


1,929 3,441 


2,533 


4,955 


14,860 14,742 


16,683 


18,598 



-6- 












FY87 


FY88 




FY85 


FY86 


Appro- 


Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


005 TOWN MANAGER: 










Salaries & Wages 


$ 74,397 


$ 77,613 


$ 83,445 


$ 91,208 


Expenses 


14,429 


14,968 


20,564 


21,243 


Labor Consultants 


13,424 


9,240 


11,734 


5,000 


Capital Outlay 


3,459 








4,458 


Total 


105,709 


101,821 


115,743 


121,909 


009 MODERATOR: 










Salary 


100 


100 


100 


100 


Expenses 








10 


10 


Total 


100 


100 


110 


110 


Oil FINANCE COMMITTEE: 










Salaries & Wages 








50 


50 


Expenses 


2,080 


2,906 


2,650 


2,960 


Total 


2,080 


2,906 


2,700 


3,010 


015 ELECTIONS & REGISTRATION: 










Salaries & Wages 


14,742 


9,046 


12,177 


9,663 


Expenses 


4,176 


4,812 


8,148 


5,150 


Total 


18,918 


13,858 


20,325 


14,813 


025 ACCOUNTANT: 










Salaries & Wages 


66,825 


74,870 


92,580 


90,437 


Expenses 


16,554 


25,367 


32,714 


33,484 


Total 


83,379 


100,237 


125,294 


123,921 


029 ASSESSORS: 










Salaries & Wages 


63,991 


68,714 


73,619 


78,949 


Valuation Fee 











205,000 


Expenses 


7,736 


9,219 


8,779 


9,918 


Capital Outlay 


595 





100 





Total 


72,322 


77,933 


82,498 


293,867 


033 TREASURER/COLLECTOR: 










Salaries & Wages 


83,972 


88,927 


94,646 


100,103 


Expenses 


17,276 


10,577 


10,107 


10,847 


Capital Outlay 








3,000 





Total 


101,248 


99,504 


107,753 


110,950 


039 TOWN CLERK: 










Salaries & Wages 


32,909 


33,884 


36,500 


39,192 


Expenses 


1,838 


3,299 


2,325 


2,360 


Capital Outlay 


2,498 








5,865 


Total 


37,245 


37,183 


38,825 


47,417 


045 LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


12,000 


Town Counsel -Litigation 


24,626 


22,646 


16,000 


20,000 


Expenses 


1,361 


654 


1,460 


2,080 


Total 


35,987 


33,300 


27,460 


34,080 



-7- 









FY87 


FY88 




FY85 


FY86 


Appro- 


Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


061 APPEALS BOARD: 










Salaries & Wages 


770 


1,107 


1,500 


1,425 


Expenses 


201 


314 


374 


501 


Capital Outlay 





168 








Total 


971 


1,589 


1,874 


1,926 


063 PLANNING BOARD: 










Salaries & Wages 


2,554 


7,500 


41,440 


43,475 


Expenses 


646 


1,110 


2,740 


5,900 


Planning Consultants: 










Reimbursable 














General 


10,652 


1,099 


500 


760 


Capital Outlay 





499 








Total 


13,852 


10,158 


44,680 


50,135 


064 MASTER PLAN COMMISSION: 










Salaries & Wages 








800 


1,000 


Planning Consultants: 





1,840 


8,000 


5,000 


Total 





1,840 


8,800 


6,000 


065 TOWN HALL & ANNEX: 










Salaries & Wages 


13,471 


15,681 


16,927 


18,199 


Expenses 


14,743 


15,297 


18,570 


17,730 


Energy Supplies 


6,279 


7,051 


8,000 


7,500 


Capital Outlay 


1,480 


3,347 


3,700 


56,313 


Total 


35,973 


41,376 


47,197 


99,742 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT: 



522,644 



536,547 



639,942 926,478 



101 



103 





PUBLIC SAFETY 








POLICE DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 


578,392 


618,881 


696,007 


785,718 


Expenses 


17,754 


19,762 


20,254 


26,451 


Energy Supplies 


19,020 


28,719 


34,710 


30,900 


Capital Outlay 


13,028 


24,339 


27,675 


34,192 


Total 


628,194 


691,701 


778,646 


877,261 


FIRE DEPARTMENT: 










Salaries & Wages 


379,286 


401,051 


440,482 


538,690 


Training 


420 


320 


1,700 


3,000 


Expenses 


32,106 


25,462 


29,130 


28,020 


Energy Supplies 


6,288 


5,214 


4,701 


4,831 


Capital Outlay 


28,873 


25,017 


13,180 


17,840 


Total 


446,973 


457,064 


489,193 


592,381 



-8- 







FY87 


FY88 


FY85 


FY86 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


49,975 


53,987 


63,597 


68,530 


18,073 


16,468 


28,504 


19,383 


3,149 


3,042 


2,601 


2,475 


2,217 


1,106 


5,600 


1,000 


73,414 


74,603 


100,302 


91,388 


10,384 


11,120 


19,451 





3,669 


7,079 


5,310 


3,945 


90 


503 


1,225 


810 


800 


16,447 


850 


15,700 


14,943 


35,149 


26,836 


20,455 


23,822 


24,692 


27,851 


35,500 


1,337 


2,293 


4,845 


2,545 








1,000 


1,500 


1,364 


988 








10,143 








1,500 


36,290 


27,898 


34,408 


41,855 


25,312 


31,538 


36,193 


38,788 











600 


2,435 


2,008 


3,530 


4,291 





292 


600 


2,001 


27,747 


33,838 


40,323 


45,680 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


2,400 


1,601 


1,836 


1,950 


2,125 





10 


96 


75 














4,001 


4,246 


4,446 


4,600 


14,600 


15,527 


17,000 


18,250 


2,806 


3,702 


4,532 


6,902 


744 


668 


697 


680 


2,243 





820 





20,393 


19,897 


23,049 


25,832 


1,251,955 


1,344,396 


1,497,203 


1,699,452 



109 FORESTRY: 

Salaries & Wages 

Expenss 

Energy Supplies 

Capital Outlay 

Total 

111 HARBORS: 
Salaries 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

112 SHELLFISH: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Consultants 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

113 BUILDING INSPECTOR: 
Salaries & Wages 
Energy Supplies 
Expenses 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

131 CIVIL DEFENSE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

133 ANIMAL CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY: 

PUBLIC WORKS 
301 ADMINISTRATION: 

Salaries & Wages 41,296 41,866 44,943 50,758 

Expenses 1,740 1,670 1,545 1,845 

Capital Outlay 900 210 230 

Total 43,036 44,436 46,698 52,833 



-9- 







FY87 


FY88 


FY85 


FY86 


Appro- 


Recom- 


Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 


126,548 


127,895 


146,130 


159,961 


144,262 


132,750 


145,302 


138,498 


124,587 


99,406 


150,000 


280,000 


56,318 


98,498 


8,000 


64,853 


451,715 


458,549 


449,432 


643,312 


20,504 


17,892 


15,000 


25,000 


56,035 


60,307 


39,875 


63,350 


5,195 


3,592 


3,500 


5,600 


11,809 


6,229 


12,000 


12,000 


93,543 


88,020 


70,375 


105,950 


21,133 


22,407 


24,056 


25,851 











500 


29,324 


27,390 


32,735 


30,037 


7,560 


10,641 


9,062 


9,500 


12,880 


13,080 





6,000 


70,897 


73,518 


65,853 


71,888 



303 HIGHWAY DIVISION: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Road Treatment 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

305 SNOW & ICE CONTROL: 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Rental 
Total 

309 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE: 
Salaries & Wages 
Consultants 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS: 659,191 664,523 632,358 873,983 







SANITATION 








403 SANITATION CONTRACT: 












Sanitation Composite 


Contract 


264,440 


307,000 


319,500 


342,000 


Spring & Fall Cleanir 


'9 


4,000 


7,500 


17,000 


19,175 


Total 




268,440 


314,500 


336,500 


361,175 


409 SEWER: 












Salaries & Wages 




133,782 


141,084 


157,563 


166,490 


Expenses 




140,000 


151,317 


167,690 


192,397 


Energy Supplies 




9,780 


7,965 


8,258 


8,778 


Capital Outlay 




1,995 


421,261 


11,000 


7,000 


Total 




285,557 


721,627 


344,511 


374,665 



TOTAL SANITATION: 553,997 1,036,127 681,011 735,840 

OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 
481 HISTORICAL COMMISSION: 



Salaries & Wages 











500 


Expenses 


165 


235 


1,000 


7,225 


Total 


165 


235 


1,000 


7,725 


487 CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 










Salaries & Wages 


797 


1,100 


1,200 


1,400 


Expenses 


744 


290 


700 


700 


Capital Outlay 


941 


994 


1,150 


1,000 


Total 


2,482 


2,384 


3,050 


3,100 



TOTAL OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 2,647 2,619 4,050 10,825 

-10- 









FY87 


FY88 




FY85 


FY86 


Appro- 


Recom- 




Expended 


Expended 


priated 


mended 




HUMAN SERVICES 








501 HEALTH: 










Salaries & Wages 


39,962 


48,430 


54,596 


60,384 


Expenses 


70,954 


80,136 


86,729 


140,106 


Capital Outlay 





4,204 


1,166 


200 


Total 


110,916 


132,770 


142,491 


200,690 


531 COUNCIL ON AGING: 










Salaries & Wages 


3,080 


3,892 


8,400 


8,216 


Expenses 


10,223 


14,129 


19,564 


19,869 


Total 


13,303 


18,021 


27,964 


28,085 


551 VETERANS BENEFITS: 










Expenses 


58,462 


64,889 


95,000 


95,000 


Total 


58,462 


64,889 


95,000 


95,000 


571 CEMETERIES & GROUNDS: 










Salaries & Wages 


130,940 


141,120 


148,077 


160,438 


Expenses 


19,300 


23,217 


19,096 


20,013 


Energy Suppl ies 


9,008 


8,663 


7,349 


7,860 


Capital Outlay 


12,412 


6,819 


21,200 


19,370 


Total 


171,660 


179,819 


195,722 


207,681 



TOTAL HUMAN SERVICES 



354,341 



395,499 



461,177 531,456 



CULTURE & RECREATION 



601 LIBRARY: 

Salaries & Wages 
Expenss 

Energy Supples 
Capital Outlay 
Total 

621 RECREATION & YOUTH SERVICES 
Salaries & Wages 
Expenses 
Energy Supplies 
Capital Outlay 
Total 



106,282 


125,899 


123,747 


139,204 


43,227 


46,341 


53,408 


59,931 


2,332 


1,922 


1,640 


1,950 


2,508 


887 


19,550 


15,730 


154,349 


165,049 


198,345 


216,815 


38,954 


41,119 


46,973 


50,178 


13,695 


14,985 


17,424 


19,397 


664 


729 


731 


775 


300 





1,913 


1,100 


53,613 


56,833 


67,041 


71,450 



TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION: 



207,962 



221,882 



265,386 288,265 



069 





UNCLASSIFIED 








INSURANCE: 










Unemployment 


974 


3,440 


6,200 


5,000 


Motor Vehicle 


14,815 


38,489 


34,825 


48,800 


Workmen's Compensation 


16,793 


28,498 


55,161 


60,677 


Package Insurance 


16,026 


101,998 


107,805 


112,635 


Public Official Bonds 


68 


1,584 


2,025 


3,200 


Legal Liability 


7,453 


12,554 


27,098 


35,564 


Total 


56,129 


186,563 


233,114 


265,876 



-11- 







FY85 
Expended 


FY86 
Expended 


FY87 * 
Appro- 
priated 


FY88 
Recom- 
mended 


069 


BENEFITS: 

Military Svc. Credits 

County Retirement System 

Health & Life 

Medicare 

Total 


10, 

273. 

92, 

376, 


,465 
,543 
,838 

,846 


10, 
229. 
101, 

342, 


,677 
,666 
,751 

,094 


14, 
309. 
118. 

io ; 

452, 


,540 
,028 
,995 
,237 
,800 


14. 
330. 
103. 

13. 
462, 


,951 
,846 
,436 
,400 
,633 


701 


DEBT SERVICE: 
Payment of Interest 
Payment of Principal 
Interest on Tax Ant. Notes 
Total 


16, 
90, 

106, 


,122 

,000 



,122 


11, 
84, 

95, 


,554 

,000 



,554 


16, 

265, 

9, 

291, 


,691 
,000 
,500 
,191 


4, 
65. 

9, 
78, 


,000 
,000 
,500 
,500 











33,700 


45,000 










22,500 


25,000 
















12,100 


12, 


,525 


12,000 


12,750 


555,391 


640, 


,233 


1,050,505 


897,359 



069 OFFICE EQUIPMENT: 4,194 3,497 5,200 7,600 

013 RESERVE FUND: (Transfers in appropriate budgets in prior years; 
funded @ $45,000 in all years) 

069 AUDIT FEE: 

069 BOND ISSUE COSTS: 

069 POSTAGE: 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED: 

TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET: $4,108,128 $4,841,826 $5,231,632 $5,963,658 

*Note: FY87 reflects supplemental budget approved September 15, 1986, plus reserve 
transfers to date. 

Seconded. Mr. Craft explained various changes in accounts. Board of Selectmen 
unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 5 

To hear and act upon the reports of the Finance Committee and of the School Com- 
mittee relative to the School Department budget and to raise, appropriate, and 
transfer money for the ensuing year's operations; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mrs. Robie moved that the Town vote to raise and approprite the sum of $6,980,000 
for the School Department Budget for FY88: 

For the School Department Budget $6,980,000 
Transfer from Available Funds: 

Feoffees of the Grammar School 2,500 

Net to be Raised and Assessed $6,977,500 



-12- 



Seconded. Mrs. Robie mentioned the large increases in salaries, insurance, and the 
building debt. George Jewell stated that the Finance Committee unanimously approved 
the budget. Superintendent Richard Thompson recognized Doyon Principal William 
Waitt, who is retiring this year and who received a standing ovation. Board of 
Selectmen unanimously recommended. Unanimous vote. 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to cover the 
Town's share of the annual operating and debt service expenses of the Whittier 
Regional Vocational Technical High School District; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

School Committeeman Lawrence Seidler moved that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $103,404 to cover the Town's share of the annual operating 
and debt service expenses of the Whittier Regional Vocational Technical High School 
District. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee una- 
nimously in favor. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 

current expenses of the Water Division, the same to be paid for by revenues of 

the Water Division during FY88, and to transfer a sum of money from the surplus 

account to Water, Plant and Investment; or to take any other action relative 

thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to raise and approprite the sum of $978,473 for 

the FY88 expenses of the Water Division: 

For the Water Division $978,473 
Transfer from Available Funds 364,490 

Net to be Raised and Assessed $613,983 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously in favor. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to raise and appropriate a sum of money and/ 
or transfer from available funds a sum of money to pay unpaid bills incurred in 
previous years and remaining unpaid; and (2) to raise and appropriate a sum of 
money and/or to appropriate a sum of money from the Water Division surplus 
account to pay any Water Division unpaid bills incurred in previous years and 
remaining unpaid; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Charles Wayne moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$65,126 to pay unpaid bills incurred in previous years and remaining unpaid, viz: 

Miscellaneous Finance 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Veterans' Benefits $16,000.26 
School Department 

Cape Ann Markets 354.89 

Loom'n Shuttle 23.98 

Sawtell's Office Supplies 17.17 

Recreation Department ' 

Super Dup'r Printing 56.70 

Fire Department 

Overtime Award 48,673.00 

$65,126.00 

-13- 



and (2) to raise this appropriation, the sum of $65,126 be transferred from the 
Federal General Revenue Sharing Account. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee recommended. A 4/5th vote was necessary for this article; the voice vote 
had one opposed. On a standing vote, one voter stood in opposition. The Moderator 
declared that a 4/5ths majority was in favor and the motion carried. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or to transfer from avail- 
able funds, sums of money to fund supplements to the Town and School Operating 
Budgets for FY87 and the Water Division Operating Budget for FY87; or to take any 
other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Thomas Elliott moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$51,964 to fund supplements to the FY87 Municipal Operating Budget as follows: 

Police Department 

Wages $16,700.64 

Expenses (Medical - D. Cole) 

°Beverly Hospital 63.61 

Fire Department 

Expenses (Medical - R. Gambale) 

°Joseph W. Mehm, M.D. 4,575.00 

Middlesex Surgical Associates 300.00 

Winchester Hospital 26.00 

Winchester Hospital 3,088.20 

Building Inspector 

Wages 1,400.00 

Accountant 

Expenses 5,780.00 

Miscellaneous Finance 

Debt Service 20,030.55 

$51,964.00 

and (2) to raise this appropriation, the following sums be transferred: 
$19,306.00 from Free Cash 

32,658.00 f rom Federal General Revenue Sharing Account 
$51,964.00 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. Unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, or the Acting 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time 
to time, in anticipation of the revenue for the financial year beginning July 01, 
1987, and ending June 30, 1988, in accordance with the provisions of the General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be 
given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of 
the General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; and (2) to authorize the 
Treasurer, or the Acting Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to enter into a written agreement with a banking institution for the provision of 
banking services to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53F of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws, as inserted by Chapter 740 of the Acts of 1985; 
or to take any action relative thereto. 

-14- 



Mr. Player moved that the Town vote (1) to authorize the Treasurer, or Acting 
Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to borrow money from time 
to time in anticipation of revenue for the financial year beginning July 1, 1987, 
and ending June 30, 1988, in accordance with the provisions of the General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year, in accordance with the provisions of the 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended; and (2) to authorize the 
Treasurer, or the Acting Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
to enter into a written agreement with a banking institution for the provision of 
banking services to the Town, in accordance with the provisions of Section 53F of 
Chapter 44 of the General Laws. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee 
unanimously recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 

To see what action the Town will take with regard to the transfer of any surplus 

funds in the Electric Light Department. 

Selectman Lawrence Pszenny moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$100,875 from the Surplus Account in the Electric Light Department for the pur- 
pose of reducing taxes. Seconded. Finance Committee unanimously recommended, 
with Allen Swan stating that the Committee had met with the Electric Department 
and reviewed its books. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town of Ipswich will vote to petition the Governor of Massachusetts 
to appoint an independent gubernatorial commission to investigate the policies 
and practices of Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company (MMWEC), in- 
cluding the propriety of MMWEC s expenditure of $320,540 to fund the Coalition 
for Reliable Energy; the economic impact upon Ipswich and other Massachusetts 
cities and towns of their $600,000,000 investment, through MMWEC, in the Seabrook 
nuclear plant, and the possibilities for mitigation of that impact; the feasibil- 
ity of MMWEC s calling for the abandonment of the Seabrook Plant or its conver- 
sion to a non-nuclear use; and the potential for MMWEC to vigorously expand its 
commitment to development of renewable energy resources, energy conservation pro- 
grams, cogeneration, load management, least cost planning, and other alternatives 
to excessive reliance on nuclear- and fossil-fuel-based energy planning; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town of Ipswich vote to petition the Governor of 
Massachusetts to appoint an independent gubernatorial commission to investigate 
the policies and practices of Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company 
(MMWEC), including the propriety of MMWECs expenditure of $320,540 to fund the 
Coalition for Reliable Energy; the economic impact upon Ipswich and other 
Massachusetts cities and towns of their $600,000,000 investment, through MMWEC, 
in the Seabrook Nuclear Plant, and the possibilities for mitigation of that 
impact; the feasibility of MMWECs calling for the abandonment of the Seabrook 
Plant or its conversion to a non-nuclear use; and the potential for MMWEC to 
vigorously expand its commitment to load management, least cost planning, and 
other alternatives to excessive reliance on nuclear and fossil-fuel-based energy 
planning. Seconded. Board of Selectmen were 3-2 in favor, feeling that it would 
be good to have a review of MMWEC done. Lee Wheeler and Harry Leno spoke in 
favor of the article; the Finance Committee agreed that an investigation of 
MMWEC is needed. The motion carried on a voice vote. 



-15- 



ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the pur- 
pose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be made avail- 
able for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,000 
for the purpose of promotion of the Town of Ipswich, an equal sum of money to be 
made available for said purposes from the Chamber of Commerce. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen, Finance Committee in favor. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage engi- 
neering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for the con- 
struction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the General 
Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, to accept, 
and to expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available for the 
aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire such 
easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effectuate said repairs, 
by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise and to convey such land(s) 
and/or easements to Essex County and authorize the filing of special legisla- 
tion(s) to help effectuate the same; and (4) to determine whether said appropria- 
tion shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from available funds, transfer from 
the Federal General Revenue Sharing Account, or otherwise; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Mr. Wayne moved that the Town vote: (1) to appropriate the sum of $455,150 to 
engage engineering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services 
for the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges under Chapter 90 of the 
General Laws, as amended; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for, 
to accept, and to expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be available 
for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to effec- 
tuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise and to 
convey such land(s) and/or easements to Essex County and authorize the filing of 
special legislation(s) to help effectuate the same; (4) of this $455,150 
appropriation, $85,870 shall be raised, and $150,000 shall be transferred from 
Overlay Surplus; (5) to change the purpose of the remaining $6,280 balance pre- 
viously appropriated under Article 29 of the April 1, 1985, Annual Town Meeting 
from "...repair and reconstruct Seaview Road, its drainage and utility systems..." 
to the purposes set forth in Section 1 herein; and (6) to raise the balance of 
this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, 
is authorized to issue $213,000 in bonds or serial notes under the provisions of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 7(5) as amended. Seconded. 
This is for the reconstruction of Linebrook Road between Howe Street and Route 1. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Carl Gardner proposed an 
amendment: "and (7) also to simultaneously investigate a more economical and 
environmentally sound solution to the safety problems along that stretch of road. 
Said solution may include, but is not limited to, consideration of improvements 
of drainage and regarding resurfacing of the road surface." Seconded. Chief 
Brouillette urged defeat of the amendment, stating that the portion of Linebrook 
Road is one of three main accident routes in Ipswich; there have been four fata- 
lities there within the past few years. The amendment failed on a voice vote. 
On the main motion, the voice vote was inconclusive. The two/thirds hand count 
was 224 in favor, 32 against; motion carried. 

-16- 



ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote: (1) to appropriate a sum of money to engage engi- 
neering services and to acquire any related materiel and/or services for the re- 
pair of town-owned and maintained bridges; (2) to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to apply for, accept, and expend any Federal and/or State grants which may be 
available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary to 
effectuate said repairs, by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; 
and (4) to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, 
transfer from available funds, transfer from the Federal General Revenue Sharing 
Account, or otherwise; or take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote: (2) to appropriate the sum of $225,000 to 
engage engineering servcies and to acquire any related materiel and/or services 
for the repair of Town-owned and maintain bridges; (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for, accept, and expend any federal and/or State grants which 
may be available for the aforementioned purposes; (3) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire such easements and/or other interest(s) as may be necessary 
to effectuate said repairs by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or other- 
wise; and (4) to raise this appropriation, the sum of $195,000 previously raised 
under Article 34 of the April 7, 1986, Annual Town Meeting be transferred and 
$30,000 be raised and assessed. Seconded. This is for repair of Choate Bridge. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. In reply to a 
question from Carl Gardner about the $30,000 appropriated last year, Mr. Howe 
said that the money is being spent on this project and we are trying to get a 
State construction grant. Mr. Gardner asked if the Historical Commission was 
satisfied; Mrs. Conley replied that it had been kept up to date about plans and 
felt that the engineer was doing a good job, though there might be problems when 
work started. The State is watching carefully. Motion carried on a unanimous 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote, pursuant to the provisions of Section 4B of Chapter 
4 of the General Laws, to rescind acceptance of the provisions of Section 42 of 
Chapter 48 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, which section previously was 
accepted under Article 19 of the December 17, 1962, Special Town Meeting; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Pszenny moved that the Town vote, pursuant to the provisions of Section 4B of 
Chapter 4 of the General Laws, to rescind acceptance of the provisions of Section 
42 of Chapter 48 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, which section pre- 
viously was accepted under Article 19 of the December 17, 1962, Special Town 
Meeting. Seconded. The Charter which Ipswich adopted after accepting this law 
gives authority for the Fire Department to the Town Manager rather than the Board 
of Selectmen. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor, Finance Committee recommended. 
Attorney Peter Ross asked for a "no" vote, stating that the State Fire Marshal 
did not think it was a good idea to rescind; it would eliminate the right to have 
a hearing. Mr. Wayne opposed the article; it was put in as a "housekeeping" 
article, but is really a General Law on the books which has not been followed. 
Mr. Pszenny did not see a negative impact if the acceptance was rescinded. 
Attorney Allen Swan said that the purpose was to convey an orderly change of 
authority as set up by the Charter. Joseph Brady, Alice Moscarillo spoke against 
the article. The Fire Chief was asked what he thought, he felt that he and the 
call firemen would be left with no protection. Sheila Mathey asked how long the 
Manager had been appointing fire personnel; at least since 1971. The motion 
failed on a voice vote. 

-17- 



ARTICLE 17 

To hear and act upon reports of the committees, and to continue such committees 

as the Town may vote to continue. 

James Berry asked that the report of the Commuter Rail Committee be accepted and 
the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mary Conley asked that the report of the Historic District Study Committee be 
accepted and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. Player moved to adjourn the meeting until the following night, April 7th, at 
7:30 a.m. Seconded. So voted. 

April 07, 1987 

At 7:40 p.m. the Moderator noted that only one-third of the voters necessary for 
a quorum were present and asked for an adjournment until 8:00 p.m. Seconded. So 
voted. At 8:00 p.m. the Meeting was again postponed for 15 minutes. At 8:15 
there were only approximately 250 voters present; the Moderator suggested that 
the Meeting be adjourned until Tuesday, April 21st at 7:30 p.m. Moved, seconded, 
voted. 

April 21, 1987 

At 7:39 p.m. on April 21st there were 151 voters present. It was moved, seconded, 
and voted to adjourn until 8:00. At 8:00 there were 240 present and it was 
moved, seconded, voted to adjourn for 15 minutes. At 8:15 there were 290 pre- 
sent, and at 8:45 the quorum was still short by 26 voters. A motion was made to 
adjourn the Meeting until Monday, April 27 at 7:30, seconded, voted. 

April 27, 1987 

On Monday, Apri 27th, there were 402 voters present by 7:45 (thanks to the 
sending of reminders to all voting households by the Town Manager; beach stickers 
were also on sale at the meeting - 65 were sold). The Moderator called the 
Meeting to order at 7:55 p.m. The final count was 556. 

In the absence of the Town Clerk, Frances Richards was nominated as Temporary 
Clerk for the Meeting, seconded, so voted. She was sworn to office by Town 
Manager George E. Howe. 

The Moderator welcomed the two new members of the Board of Selectmen - James 
Engel and Robert Leet. Jeffrey Simons asked for a moment of silence in memory of 
late School Committee member Thomas Emery. 

Tellers appointed were Kathy Huff, Janet Foote, Jean Parker, Peg Broekel and 
Terri Stephens. 

A motion was made to allow the non-voters to attend. Seconded, voted. 

(Article 17 (cont'd) 

Mr. Simonds asked that the report of the School Building Needs Committee be 

accepted and the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mrs. Stephens moved that the Hall -Haskell House Committee report be accepted and 
the Committee continued. Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

-18- 



Richard Nylen asked that the report of the Master Plan Commission be accepted and 
the Commission continued for one year. Seconded. Sara O'Connor moved to amend 
the motion as follows: that the Ipswich Housing Authority appoint to less than 
two members to sit in representation for said Housing Authority on the Master 
Plan Commission until its dissolution, and one member of the Ipswich Fair Housing 
Committee. Seconded. The Moderator ruled the amendment out of order because any 
change in the makeup of a committee should appear on the Warrant. The main 
motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich by redesignating " SECTION X. ADMINISTRATION " as " SECTION XII. ADMINISTRA- 
TION " and by creating a new " SECTION X. SITE PLAN REVIEW " as follows: 
" SECTION X. SITE PLAN REVIEW 

A. Statement of Purpose 

The purpose of this section is to provide for Planning Board review of certain 
construction projects to ensure that sound site utilization principles are 
used to provide for and protect the public health, safety and general well- 
being, in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A. 

B. Applicability 

No building permit shall be issued for the construction of any new community 
facility, commercial, industrial, or business building or for any additions or 
alterations in excess of 2,500 square feet of gross floor area of any existing 
community facility, commercial, industrial, or business building or the con- 
struction of any drive-through facility, unless a site plan has been submitted 
and approved in accordance with the requirements set forth in this section. 

C. General Standards 

In the review of any site plan conducted under this Section, the Planning 
Board (herein "Board") shall determine that reasonably adequate provisions 
have been made by the applicant for the following: 

1. Traffic circulation and access; 

2. Pedestrian safety and access; 

3. Off-street parking and loading which is in compliance with the applicable 
requirements of the Protective Zoning By-Law; 

4. Emergency vehicle access; 

5. Storm water drainage, based upon a professional engineering report, utiliz- 
ing on-site absorption wherever practical; 

6. Water supply and sewage disposal adequate to support the intended use(s); 

7. Screening, including the use of natural land features, plantings, and ero- 
sion control; and 

8. Signage and exterior lighting. 

The Board shall further review the site plan to assure compliance with the 
existing provisions of the Protective Zoning By-Law. 

D. Submission Procedure 

1. Anyone seeking approval of a site plan shall obtain an application and 
checklist from the Board's Office. Prior to submitting the application, 
the owner of the subject property, or his or her agent, shall meet with 
the designee of the Board for the purpose of reviewing the application and 
the site plan review checklist. The designee of the Board shall finish his 
or her review of the application and complete the site plan review check- 
list within seven (7) days of said meeting. The completed application, 



-19- 



together with the documentation required by this section, shall then be sub- 
mitted by the applicant to the Board, accompanied by an application fee of 
fifty dollars ($50). A copy of the application shall forthwith be filed 
with the Town Clerk by the applicant. Within five (5) business days of re- 
ceipt by the Board or its designee, the Board shall distribute copies of 
the application and accompanying documentation to all appropriate Town 
boards, departments and commissions. Any comment by such boards, depart- 
ments or commissions shall be filed with the Board within twenty (20) days 
of its receipt. 

2. The Board shall hold a public hearing on the application within thirty (30) 
days of its receipt. Notice of the hearing shall be given by publication 
in a newspaper of general circulation in the Town once in each of two suc- 
cessive weeks, the first publication to be not less than fourteen (14) days 
before the date of the hearing, and by posting such notice in a conspicuous 
place in Town Hall for a period of not less than fourteen (14) days before 
the day of such hearing. In addition, notice of said hearing shall be sent 
by mail, postage prepaid, to all parties in interest as specified in Massa- 
chusetts General Laws Chapter 40A, Section 11. All costs for publication 
and notice of the public hearing shall be borne by the applicant. 

3. Within forty-five (45) days of the date of filing of the application with 
the Town Clerk, the Board shall approve or disapprove the site plan as sub- 
mitted or as amended. If the Board does not approve or disapprove the site 
plan within this period, the site plan shall be deemed approved. If the 
Board shall vote to disapprove, the applicant shall be notified in writing 
and the specific reasons for disapproval shall be stated. 

E. Submission Requirements 

A formal application for site plan review shall contain at least the following 
exhibits and information: 

1. A fully executed and signed copy of the application for site plan review. 

2. Fight (8) copies of a site plan stamped by a professional engineer, sur- 
veyor or landscape architect and drawn at a scale sufficient to allow re- 
view of the items listed under the proceding general standards, but at not 
greater than fifty (50) feet to the inch for that portion of the total 
tract of land being proposed for development, and showing the following: 

a. Owner's name, address and signature; 

b. Names and addresses of all abutting property owners; 

c. Locus map showing general location of the site within the Town; 

d. Boundary of the entire parcel held in common ownership by the Applicant 
regardless of whether all or part is being developed at this time; 

e. The bearings and distances of all property lines; 

f . Zoning classif ication(s) of the property and the location of zoning dis- 
trict boundaries if the property is located in two (2) or more zoning 
districts; 

g. The location of all existing and proposed buildings with all set-backs; 
h. The location, size, and type of all signs and exterior lighting; 

i. The lot area of the parcel and street frontage; 

j. The location of all existing and proposed buildings (including size and 
height), driveways, sidewalks, parking spaces, loading areas, open 
spaces, trees of 6" caliper or greater, open drainage courses, signs, 
exterior lighting, service areas, easements, and landscaping; 

k. The approximate location of all buildings, intersection roads, and drive- 
ways within the two hundred (200) feet of the parcel; 



-20- 



1. A storm water drainage plan showing: 

(1) The existing and proposed method of handling storm water run-off; 

(2) The direction of flow of the run-off through use of arrows; 

(3) The location, elevation, and size of all catchbasins, drywells, 
drainage ditches, swales, retention basins, and storm sewers; and 

(4) Engineering calculations used to determine drainage requirements 
based upon a ten (10) year storm frequency; 

m. Existing and proposed topography of the site at one (1) foot contour 

intervals; and 
n. A plan showing all provisions for water supply and waste water disposal 

including the size and location of all piping, holding tanks, leach 

field, etc. 
3. Copies of any proposed or existing easements; 

F. The Board may require the posting, prior to approval of any plan, of security 
in such form as permitted by Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 41, Section 
81U, and in such amounts as are deemed by the Board as being reasonably neces- 
sary to ensure completion of all improvements required as conditions of 
approval of such plan. 

G. The Board may engage the services of a technical consultant s) to review any 
site plan when it believes professional review is necessary to accomplish the 
purposes of this section. The costs for any professional review shall be 
borne by the applicant but shall not exceed three hundred dollars ($300.00) 
plus twenty-five dollars ($25.00) per 1,000 square feet of gross floor area. 

H. Waiver 

The Board may waive, by an affirmative vote of four (4) out of five (5) mem- 
bers, any of the preceding requirements, if it feels that the strict compli- 
ance with this section will, because of the size or special nature of the 
proposed building or structure, create an undue hardship on the applicant and 
not be in the public interest. 

I. Application and Checklist 

The Board shall adopt an application form and a checklist to assist applicants 
in complying with these provisions. 

J. Appeal 

Any appeal of the decision of the Planning Board under this section shall be 
governed by Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 40A, Section 17."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Benjamin Fierro moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of 
the Town of Ipswich by redesignating " SECTION X. ADMINISTRATION " as " SECTION XII. 
ADMINISTRATION" and by creating a new " SECTION X. SITE PLAN REVIEW " as presented 
in Article 18 in the Warrant for this Meeting. Seconded. Mr. Fierro mentioned 
that there was an error: " SECTION XII. ADMINISTRATION " should read " SECTION XI. 
ADMINISTRATION" . Board of Selectmen 3-2 in favor, Planning Board recommended, 
Finance Committee against. Bill Craft, Nora Mitchell, George Jewell, Web 
Bingham, Douglas Denninger, Lillian North spoke in favor. A two-thirds vote was 
required, 410 voted with 273 needed to pass; 337 voted in favor, 73 against; 
motion carried. 

-21- 



ARTICLE 19 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town 
of Ipswich by deleting from "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS— WHOLESALE, 
TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL — Processing and treating of raw materials not en- 
closed, including operations appurtenant to the removal, such as grading, drying, 
sorting, crushing, grinding and milling operations", under the column headed "I" 
the following designation: "SBA"; and by substituting in lieu thereof the follow- 
ing symbol: "-"; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

George Mathey moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich by addition to "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS — 
WHOLESALE, TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL — Processing and treating of raw 
materials not enclosed, including operations appurtenant to the removal, such as 
grading, drying, sorting, crushing, grinding and milling operations" the words 
"for municipal purposes" at the end of the paragraph, and by adding under columns 
RRA, RRB and I, the following designation "SBA". Seconded. Board of Selectmen 
recommended, Finance Committee opposed 7-2, Planning Board recommended 4-0. On 
the two-thirds vote, 411 voted (274 needed), 175 in favor, 236 against; motion 
failed to carry. 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town 
of Ipswich by deleting from "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS— WHOLESALE, 
TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL— Removal of sand, gravel, or loam" under the 
Columns headed "RRA" and "RRB" the following designation: "SBS"; and by substi- 
tuting in lieu thereof the following symbol: "-"; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Mathey moved that the Twon vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the 
Town of Ipswich by deleting from "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS" the 
following regulations under "WHOLESALE, TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL": 

DISTRICT 

RRA RRB IR B I 



"Removal of sand, gravel or loam SBS SBS - - SBS"; 

and addition under "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS" the following 
regulations under "WHOLESALE, TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL": 

DISTRICT 

RRA RRB IR B I 
"Removal of sand, gravel or loam for commercial, 
wholesale, transportation and industrial uses - - - SBS". 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee opposed, Planning Board recom- 
mended. Harry Leno spoke in opposition. Voice vote was inconclusive and more 
than seven voters stood to question it. On a two-thirds hand count, 430 voted 
(287 needed) with 225 in favor, 205 against; motion failed to carry. 

ARTICLE 21 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the 
Town of Ipswich by adding to "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS— WHOLESALE, 
TRANSPORTATION AND INDUSTRIAL— Power plant, refuse incineration and sanitary 
landfill, or wastewater treatment facility", the following words "for Municipal 
Use Only"; and (2) by adding to SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS, under the 
column heading "ACCESSORY USE" the following: 

RRA RRB IR B I 
"Wastewater Plant or Package Wastewater Plant SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB"; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

-22- 



Mr. Mathey moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the 
Town of Ipswich (1) by adding to "SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE 

REGULATIONS-COMMUNITY FACILITIES— Power plant, refuse incineration and sanitary 
landfill, or wastewater treatment facility", the following words "for Municipal 
Use Only"; and (2) by addition to SECTION V.D. TABLE OF USE REGULATIONS, under 
the column heading "ACCESSORY USE" the following: 

RRA RRB IR B I 
"Wastewater Plant or Package Wastewater Plant 
or Power Plant SPB SPB SPB SPB SPB 

Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board unanimously 
supported. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town o 
Ipswich by (1) deleting from "SECTION VI. TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGU- 
LATIONS, Paragraph A." the following regulations under the Intown Residence Dis- 

MINIMUM 
MINIMUM MINIMUM LOT MINIMUM YARDS 

LOT AREA LOT WIDTH FRONTAGE FR0NT(D( 7 ) SIDE< 2 H7) rear(?)(7) 

DISTRICT USE (sq.ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) 



MAXIMUM 


MINIM 


BUILDING 


OPEf 


AREA 


SPACI 


(%) 


(X) 



Intown Residence Single-family 

attached 3,200< 3 ) 20 20 20 none (4) 20 50 30' 

(2) adding "SECTION VI. TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS, Paragraph 
A." the following regulations under the Rural and Residence (RRA and RRB) Dis- 
tricts: 

MINIMUM MAXIMUM MINIMI 

MINIMUM MINIMUM LOT MINIMUM YARDS BUILDING OPEf 

LOT AREA LOT WIDTH FRONTAGE FRONT^M 7 ) SIDE( 2 >( 7 ) REAR<2)(7) AREA SPACE 

DISTRICT USE (sq.ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (ft.) (%) {%) 



}ural Residence Single-family 

(RRA & RRB) attached see§IX-A 20 20 20 None (4) 20 See§IX-A See17 

(3) deleting from SECTION IX, Subsection A. the following paragraph: 

"7.b. (3) Minimum lot width, front, rear and side requirements shall be deter- 
mined by the topography of the land, provided, however, that such set- 
back requirements shall not be less than the dimensional requirements 
for single-family attached dwellings in the Intown Residential Dis- 
tricts."; 

(4) adding to SECTION IX, Subsection A. the following paragraph: 

"7.b. (3) Minimum lot width, front, rear and side requirements shall be deter- 
mined by the topography of the land, provided however, that such set- 
back requirements shall not be less than the dimensional requirements 
for single-family attached dwellings in the Rural Residential Dis- 
tricts."; 

and (5) deleting the third sentence of paragraph "9." of "SECTION IX. SPECIAL 
REGULATIONS", "Subsection A. Open Space Preservation Zoning " and by inserting in 
lieu thereof the following sentence: "In any case, a conservation restriction 
prepared in accordance with the provisions of Sections 31 through 33, inclusive, 
of Chapter 184 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in a 
form suitable for execution by the Secretary of Environmental Affairs, enforce- 
able by the Town, shall be recorded, and shall provide that such land shall be 

-23- 



kept, in perpetuity, in an open or natural state, in accordance with the above- 
noted sections of Chapter 184 of the General Laws."; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Nylen moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the 
Town of Ipswich as contained in Article 22 in the Warrant for this Meeting. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board unanimously 
recommended. Motion carried on a unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 23 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town 
of Ipswich by creating a new " SECTION XI. DEMOLITION DELAY " as follows: 
" SECTION XI. DEMOLITION DELAY 

A. Intent and Purpose 

The purpose of this Section is the preserving and protecting of significant 
buildings within the Town which constitute or reflect distinctive features of 
the architectural, cultural, political, economic, and/or social history of the 
Town; to encourage owners of such buildings to seek out persons who might be 
willing to purchase, preserve, rehabilitate, or restore such buildings rather 
than demolish them; and by furthering these purposes, to promote the public 
welfare, to protect the resources of the Town, and to preserve the Town as an 
attractive and desirable place in which to live. To achieve these purposes, 
the Ipswich Historical Commission (the "Commission") is empowered to advise 
the Building Inspector with respect to the issuance of permits for demolition 
of significant buildings. The issuance of demolition permits for significant 
buildings is regulated as provided in this by-law. 

B. Definitions 

1. Building - as defined in " SECTION III ." of The Protective Zoning By-Law of 
the Town of Ipswich. 

2. Demolition - any act of pulling down, destroying, removing, or razing a 
building, or any exterior portion thereof, or commencing the work of total 
or substantial destruction, with the intent of completing the same. 

3. Significant Building - any building or portion thereof which 

a. is in whole or in part seventy-five or more years old; 

b. is listed on, or is within an area listed on, the National Register of 
Historical Places, or is the subject of a pending application for listing 
on said National Register; 

c. is protected by a Preservation Agreement with the Commission or the Heri- 
tage Trust; or 

d. is determined by a majority of the Commission to be historically or archi- 
tecturally significant in terms of period, style, method of building con- 
struction, or association with a famous architect, or builder, or other 
historically significant person, event or process either by itself or in 
the context of a group of buildings. The Commission shall make such a de- 
termination within ten days of receiving a request, in hand or by certi- 
fied mail, from the Building Inspector. 

4. Preferably-Preserved Significant Building - any significant building which 
the Commission determines, as provided in Section C, is in the public inter- 
est to be preserved or rehabilitated, rather than to be demolished. 

5. Commission - the Ipswich Historical Commission. 



-24- 



C. Procedure 

1. Upon receipt of an application for a demolition permit, the Building In- 
spector shall date-stamp the application and forward a copy to the Chairman 
of the Commission within three days. No demolition permit shall be issued 
at that time. 

2. The Commission shall within ten days of the date of receipt of an applica- 
tion determine whether the building is a significant building. If the new 
building is determined not to be significant, the Commission shall notify 
the Building Inspector and the owner, in hand or by certified mail, within 
fourteen days of the date of application, that a demolition permit may be 
issued. 

3. If the Commission determines that the building, for which a demolition per- 
mit has been applied, is a significant building, the Chairman of the Commis- 
sion shall notify the Building Inspector and the owner of the building, in 
hand or by certified mail, within fourteen days of the date of the receipt 
of the application for a demolition permit. The demolition permit shall be 
denied at this time; and the Commission shall advise the owner of the build- 
ing of the procedure to be followed to determine whether a permit to demol- 
ish a significant building may be issued. 

4. Before approval or disapproval of the application for the demolition of a 
significant building, a public hearing shall be held by the Commission, 
within forty-five days of the submission of the application. Notice of the 
time and place of such hearing shall be given by the Board at the expense 
of the applicant by advertisement in a newspaper of general circulation in 
the Town of Ipswich, once in each of two successive weeks, the first publi- 
cation being not less than fourteen days before the day of the hearing. A 
copy of said notice shall be mailed to the applicant and to all owners of 
land abutting upon and/or within 300 feet of the lot on which the signifi- 
cant building is located, as appearing in the most recent tax list. 

5. If, after such hearing, the Commission determines that the demolition of 
the significant building would not be detrimental to the historical or 
architectural heritage or resources of the Town or is an imminent threat to 
public health and safety, the Commission shall so notify the Building 
Inspector and the owner, in hand or by certified mail, within twenty-one 
days after the public hearing. Upon receipt of such notification, or after 
the expiration of twenty-one days from the conduct of the hearing, if the 
Building Inspector and the owner have not received notification from the 
Commission, the Building Inspector may, subject to the requirements of the 
state Building Code and other applicable laws, by-laws, rules and regula- 
tions, issue the demolition permit. 

6. If the Commission determines that the demolition of the significant build- 
ing would be detrimental to the historical or architectural heritage or 
resources of the Town, such building shall be considered a preferably- 
preserved significant building. In making such a determination, the Com- 
mission may consider any hardships associated with the property. 

7. Upon such determination by the Commission, the Commission shall so advise 
the applicant and the Building Inspector, in hand or by certified mail, 
within twenty-one days of the conduct of the hearing and no demolition per- 
mit may be issued until six months after the date of such determination by 
the Commission, except under the conditions of paragraph 8 of this subsec- 
tion. 



-25- 



8. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, the Building Inspector may issue a 
demolition permit for a preferably-preserved significant building after re- 
ceipt of written advice from the Commission to the effect that either 

(a) the Commission is satisfied at any time after the conduct of the hear- 
ing that there is no reasonable likelihood either the owner or some 
other person or group is willing to purchase, preserve, rehabilitate or 
restore such building; or 

(b) the Commission is satisfied that for at least six months the owner has 
made continuing, bona fide, and reasonable efforts to locate a pur- 
chaser to preserve, rehabilitate, and restore the subject building, and 
that such efforts have been unsuccessful. These efforts would include 
listing the building with a realtor or realtors for the six months, ad- 
vertising in local general circulation newspapers, and advertise in one 
Boston general circulation newspaper. 

D. Enforcement and Remedies 

1. The Commission and/or the Building Inspector are each authorized to insti- 
tute any and all proceedings, in law or equity, as either deems necessary 
and/or appropriate to obtain compliance with the requirements of this by- 
law, and/or to prevent any violation thereof. 

2. No building permit shall be issued with respect to any premises upon which 
a significant building has been voluntarily demolished in violation of this 
by-law for a period of two years after the date of the completion of such 
demolition as determined by the Building Inspector and documented in a 
letter to the Commission. As used herein, "premises" includes the parcel 
of land upon which the demolished significant building was located. 

3. Upon a determination by the Commission that a building is a preferably- 
preserved significant building, the owner shall be responsible for properly 
securing the building, if vacant, to the satisfaction of the Building In- 
spector. Should the owner fail so to secure the building, and as a result, 
such building is lost through fire or other cause, this shall be considered 
voluntary demolition for the purposes of Section 2. 

E. Ordinary Maintenance 

Nothing in this by-law shall be construed to prevent the ordinary maintenance, 
repair, or replacement of any exterior architectural feature(s). 

F. Severability 

If any section, paragraph, or part of this by-law is for any reason declared 
invalid or unconstitutional by any court, every other section, paragraph, and 
part shall continue in full force and effect. 

G. Appeal 

Any appeal shall be in accordance with Chapter 40C of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts."; 

or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Master Plan Commission member Ruthanne Rogers stated that before making her 
motion, she wished to explain. When the Historical Subcommittee of the Master 
Plan Committee started working on the Demolition Delay By-law, it consulted the 
Massachusetts Historical Commission and all the Massachusetts cities/towns which 
already have such a by-law. In all of them, it is a General By-law. However, 
when Town Counsel reviewed the article, he felt that it should be a zoning by-law 
and accordingly, it was put in the Warrant as such. The subcommittee spoke with 

-26- 



the attorney for the Massachusetts Historical Commission, who felt it should be a 
General By-law, and he spoke to the Attorney General's office, which have preli- 
minary approval as a General By-law. The Subcommittee therefore decided to pre- 
sent the article as a General By-law amendment, with changes outlined in response 
to suggestions and criticisms raised at two public hearings, as well as 
typographical errors. The Zoning By-law amendment is being converted to a 
General By-law amendment as shown on the paper handed out at the door. 

Mrs. Rogers then moved to amend the motion as follows: I move that the Town vote 
to amend the General By-laws of the Town of Ipswich by inserting a new "Chapter XVI 
PROCEDURE FOR DELAYING THE DEMOLITION OF HISTORICALLY OR ARCHITECTURALLY 
SIGNIFICANT BUILDINGS" as follows: 

a.) that the title of SECTION XI be as indicated hereinabove; and 

b.) by inserting in the second line of subsection 2(b) the word "substantial" 

so that the affected clause shall read as follows: "...or any substantial 

exterior portion thereof..."; and 
c.) by deleting in the third line of subsection 3(a) the words "three days" and 

by inserting in lieu thereof the words "four days"; and 
d.) by deleting in the second line of subsection 3(b) the last word thereof 

("new") so that the sentence shall begin as follows: "If the building is 

determined not to be significant..." and 
e.) by deleting in the fifth line of subsection 3(g) the words "paragraph 8" and 

inserting in lieu thereof the words "subsection 3(h)"; and 
f.) by deleting in the sixth line of subsection 3(h)(2) the word "advertise" and 

by inserting in lieu thereof the word "advertising"; and 
g.) by deleting from the second line of Section 5 in the last word ("s") so that 

the last word shall read "feature"; and 
h.) by deleting "Section 7. Appeal" in its entirety; and 

i.) by resdesignating "Section 6. Severability" as "Section 7. Severability"; and 
j.) by inserting a new "Section 6. Portions of Significant Buildings" as follows: 

"Nothing in this by-law shall be construed to prevent 
the demolition of those portions of significant buildings 
which are not in themselves significant. In such cases, 
the Historical Commission shall notify the building inspect- 
or within fourteen days of the date of application that a 
demolition permit may be issued." 

Seconded. A five-minute recess was called for a conference between the Town 
Manager, Moderator, Acting Town Counsel Allen Swan and Richard Nylen, to try to 
clear up the confusion between the Warrant Article and the motion proposed by 
Mrs. Rogers. After the recess, Mrs. Rogers spoke in favor of her motion, noting 
that 760 of the 5000 buildings in Ipswich are more than one hundred years old. 
The proposed amendment has been endorsed by the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission's attorney and given a preliminary o.k. by the Attorney General's 
office. Board of Selectmen supported 4-1 the content of the article, though with 
some misgivings as to whether the Attorney General would approve it in view of 
the confusion between Zoning and General By-laws. Mr. Elliott preferred to see 
it as a General By-law and felt it should be voted on at a future Meeting. The 
Finance Committee supported the intent and urged consideration at a future 
Meeting. The Planning Board supported the article, as did the Master Plan 
Commission. Mrs. Conley supported it as a General By-law amendment. The 
question was moved, seconded, and voted. Motion carried on a voice vote. 



-27- 



ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich by changing the dimensional requirements for the construction of multi- 
family housing by amending the Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of Ipswich by 
deleting from SECTION VI, TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS, "Intown 
Residence", the following words: "Multi-family 8,000 plus 3,000 per dwelling 
unit" and by substituting in lieu thereof the following: "Multi-family 9,000 
plus 5,000 per dwelling unit"H and to amend by insertion as Footnote ^ in the 
TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS FOOTNOTES the following: " n The 
number of dwelling units obtained by this requirement may be increased by Special 
Permit of the Planning Board if the Planning Board determines that the Multi- 
family dwelling shall provide significant public benefit to the Town. Public 
benefit may include, but not be limited to, providing low to moderate income 
housing, hospice, or public recreational facilities. Low and moderate income 
housing shall mean any housing subsidized, in whole or in part, by any Federal or 
State program administered by the Department of Housing and Urban Development 
(HUD), Executive Office of Communities and Development (EOCD), or the Massachu- 
setts Housing Finance Agency. Under no circumstances shall the Planning Board 
waive the density and dimensional requirements to exceed 8,000 square feet plus 
3,000 square feet per dwelling unit in overall density."; or to take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Planning Board member Patrick McNally moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Protective Zoning By-law of the Town of Ipswich as contained in Article 28 in -the 
Warrant for this Meeting. Seconded. Board of Selectmen against 4-1, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommends, Planning Board unanimously in favor. Mr. 
McNally felt it would maintain character in the downtown residential district. 
Question was moved, seconded, voted. Voice vote on motion inconclusive; on a 
two-thirds hand count, 303 voted (202 needed) with 284 in favor, 19 against; 
motion carried. 

ARTICLE 29 

To see if the Town will vote to petition the Massachusetts General Court to enact 
legislation to authorize the Town: (a) to collect a land transfer fee not to ex- 
exceed two per cent (2%) of the purchase price upon the transfer of certain real 
property interests located in the Town; (b) to establish a Land Bank Fund in the 
Town treasury; (c) to establish a Land Bank Commission to manage and expend said 
Fund for the purchase and maintenance of certain categories of land and interests 
therein; (d) to allocate the use of said Fund by said Commission for Open Space 
and Affordable Housing, but not less than twenty-five per cent (25%) shall be 
expended for either use; (e) to allow debt incurred for the purpose of this Act 
to be retired by expenditures from said Fund; and (f) and to provide that the 
authority granted herein shall not reduce state tax revenues pursuant to General 
Laws, Chapter 62F, Section 4.; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Master Plan member Richard Howard moved that the Town vote to petition the 
Massachusetts General Court to enact legislation to authorize the Town: (a) to 
collect a land transfer fee not to exceed two percent (2%) of the purchase price 
upon the transfer of certain real property interests located in the Town; (b) to 
establish a Land Bank Fund in the Town Treasury; (c) to establish a Land Bank 
Commission to manage and expend said Fund for the purchase and maintenance of 
certain categories of land and interests therein; (d) to allocate the use of said 
Fund by said Commission for Open Space and Affordabe Housing, but not less than 
twenty-five percent (25%) shall be expended for either use; (3) to allow debt 
incurred for the purpose of this Act to be retired by expenditures from said 



-28- 



Fund; and (f) to provide that the authority granted herein shall not reduce state 
tax revenues pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 62F, Section 4. Seconded. Board 
of Selectmen unanimously against, Finance Committee 7-2 against, Planning Board 
3-1 in favor, Conservation Committee 5-2 in favor. Sara O'Connor spoke against, 
Frederick Winthrop in favor. Question moved, seconded, voted. On a hand count, 
116 in favor, 176 against; motion failed to carry. 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich by adding to " SECTION VII. OFF-STREET PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS ", 
"Paragraph B. Loading Requirements .", subparagraph "5.", the following: "The 
Planning Board may approve by Special Permit an alternative to those requirements 
as stated in Section VII. CI."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Planning Board member John Logan moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective 
Zoning By-law of the Town of Ipswich by adding to "SECTION VII. OFF-STREET 
PARKING AND LOADING REGULATIONS ," "Paragraph B. Loading Requirements .", sub- 
paragraph "5.", the following: "The Planning Board may approve by Special Permit 
an alternative to those requirements as stated in SECTION VII.C.I .". Seconded. 
Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, Planning Board unanimously recommended. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town 
of Ipswich as follows: (1) by adding a new subsection "E." to SECTION V. USE REGU - 
LATIONS as follows: 

"E. Lots Situated in More Than One District . Such lots shall be subject to the 
Use Regulations which apply to the Zoning District in which the development 
is occuring. In the case of developments which occur in more than one dis- 
trict, each part of the development shall be governed by the Use Regulations 
which apply to each such District."; and 
(2) By adding a new subsection H. to SECTION VI. DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULA- 
TIONS as follows: 

"H. Lots Situated in More Than One District . Such lots shall be subject to the 
Dimensional and Density Regulations which apply to the Zoning District in 
which the development is occuring. In the case of developments which occur 
in more than one district, each part of the development shall be governed by 
the Dimensional and Density Regulations which apply to each such District."; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. McNally moved that the Town vote to amend the Protective Zoning By-law of the 
Town of Ipswich as presented in Article 31 in the Warrant for this Meeting. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommended 3-1, Finance Committee unanimously in 
favor, Planning Board unanimously in favor. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote (1) to accept the provisions of Section 16 of Chap- 
ter 270 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and/or (2) to 
designate the Health Agent; Harbormaster; Assistant Harbormaster(s), if any; and 
police officers as the enforcing agents for this statute; and (3) to amend "THE 
GENERAL BY-LAWS OF THE TOWN OF IPSWICH, CHAPTER XV MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS FOR 
PUBLIC ORDER AND SAFETY" by adding the following sentence to Section 7 thereof: 
"This by-law and Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 270, Section 16, may be en- 
forced by the Health Agent, Harbormaster, Assistant Harbormaster(s), if any, and 
police officers."; or to take any other action relative thereto. 



-29- 



Mr. Nylen moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on a 
voice vote. 

ARTICLE 33 

To see if the Town will vote to amend The Protective Zoning By-Law of the Town of 
Ipswich to allow the reduction of the minimum lot width when a lot is larger than 
normally required as follows: (1) to repeal the minimum lot width (ft.) in the 
TABLE OF DIMENSIONAL AND DENSITY REGULATIONS in the Rural Residential (RRA & RRB) 
Districts pertaining to single-family detached use which states "190", and to 
substitute the following in place thereof "190^"; (2) to amend by insertion as 
Footnote** in the Table of Dimensional and Density Regulations Footnotes the fol- 
lowing: "In the case of a lot of land which exceeds two (2) acres (87,120 square 
feet) in area, the minimum lot width may be reduced to no less than fifty feet 
(50') provided: (a) that no portion of the front yard shall be less than fifty 
feet (50') in width measured perpendicular to the side lot lines; (b) that the 
owner grants a permanent covenant to and permanently enforceable by the Town that 
the lot will not be reduced in area, subdivided, or used as access or frontage 
for any future subdivision(s); (c) that there is constructed a turning area suf- 
ficient for fire or police vehicles to maneuver adjacent to the dwelling without 
blocking any driveways; and (d) notwithstanding Footnote 2 of the Table of Dimen- 
sional and Density Regulations Footnotes, the Zoning Board of Appeals shall not 
have the authority to reduce by special permit the minimum side or rear yard 
requirements." or to take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Attorney Timothy Perkins moved to indefinitely postpone. Seconded, Motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 34 

To see if the Town will vote to accept Colonial Drive as a Town Street; or to 

take any other action relative thereto. (By Petition) 

Mr. George moved for indefinite postponement. Seconded. Motion carried on voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 35 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind that portion of bonded debt which was 
authorized but unissued under Article 9 of the October 23, 1985, Special Town 
Meeting; and that portion of bonded debt which was authorized but unissued under 
Article 24 of the April 01, 1985, Annual Town Meeting; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved that the Town vote to rescind that portion of bonded debt which 
was authorized but unissued under Article 9 of the October 23, 1985, Special Town 
Meeting; and that portion of bonded debt which was authorized but unissued under 
Article 24 of the April 1, 1985, Annual Town Meeting. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 36 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to under- 
take repairs and/or reconstruction of the tennis courts at Bialek Field, 
Linebrook Road; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Player moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $35,000 
to undertake repairs and/or reconstruction of the tennis courts at Bialek Field, 
Linebrook Road. Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously recommended, Finance 
Committee against. Recreation Director Elizabeth Dorman spoke in favor. The 
question was moved, seconded, voted. Motion carried on a voice vote. 

-30- 



ARTICLE 37 

To see it the Town will vote (1) to appropriate a sum of money in addition to the 
sum appropriated under Article 30 of the April 07, 1986, Annual Town Meeting to 
undertake a sewer system evaluation survey, and to obtain all materiel and ser- 
vices necessary and incidental thereto; (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to apply for Federal and/or State aid in conjunction therewith; and (3) to de- 
termine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing, transfer from 
available funds, or otherwise, all of the above authorizations to be contingent 
upon the award of a state grant for reimbursement of 90% of the project costs; 
or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Elliott moved (1) to raise and appropriate the sum of $38,000 in addition to 
the sum appropriated under Article 30 of the April 7, 1986, Annual Town Meeting 
to undertake a sewer system evaluation survey, and to obtain all materiel and 
services necessary and incidental thereto; and (2) to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to apply for Federal and/or State aid in conjunction therewith. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended. Unanimous voice 
vote. 

ARTICLE 38 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to design, 
construct and install a pedestrian traffic signal system on Central Street to 
serve the Winthrop School; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $50,000 
to design, construct and install a pedestrian traffic signal system on Central 
Street to serve the Winthrop School. Seconded. Board of Selectmen recom- 
mended. Mr. Craft, for the Finance Committee, moved to amend the main motion 
for Article 38 to read: That the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$12,000 to study pedestrian traffic on Central Street as it relates to the 
Winthrop School, and further to direct the Selectmen to direct the Chief of 
Police (through the Town Manager) to assign uniformed officers to provide 
crossing assistance to Winthrop School children before and after school when- 
ever civilian crossing guards are not on duty. Seconded. Chief Brouillette, 
stated that it has been difficult in the past to hire crossing guards, sup- 
ported the motion for a traffic signal, as did the Friends of Winthrop. Board 
of Selectmen were 4-1 against the amendment; Mr. Dupray also spoke against it. 
The question was moved, seconded, voted. The amendment failed on a voice vote. 
The question was moved, seconded, voted. The voice vote on the motion was 
inconclusive; on the hand count, 147 voted in favor, 86 against; motion carried. 

ARTICLE 39 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to provide 
an operating subsidy to Beverly Hospital for the continued operation of an Emer- 
gency Room facility at the present Cable Hospital campus, on a twenty-four-hour- 
per-day basis; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Cable Emergency Advisory Committee member Kevin Craig moved that the Town vote 
to raise' and appropriate the sum of $180,000 to provide an operating subsidy to 
Beverly Hospital for the continued operation of an Emergency Room facility at 
the present Cable Hospital campus, on a twenty-four-hour-per-day basis. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee unanimously recommended. 
Peter Dziadose and Walter Pojasek both spoke in favor of the motion. The 
question was moved, seconded, voted. The motion carried on a majority voice 
vote. 

-31- 



ARTICLE 40 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be placed 

in the Stabilization Fund; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $34,540 
to be placed in the Stabilization Fund. Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance 
Committee recommended. Motion carried on a majority voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and so voted to dissolve the 1987 Annual Town Meeting at 
11:59 p.m. 




Town of Ipswich 
Board of Selectmen 

David S. Player, Jr., Chairman 
William E. George 
Lawrence J. Pszenny 
Charles J. Wayne 
Thomas A. Elliott 



*••***** 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

ESSEX, ss 

To the Constable of the Town of Ipswich in said County, 

GREETINGS: 

In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, you are hereby directed to 

notify the inhabitants of the Town of Ipswich, qualified to vote in Town affairs, 

to meet at the IPSWICH HIGH SCHOOL in said Ipswich on MONDAY, THE TWENTY-EIGHTH 

DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 1987, 7:30 o'clock, in the evening, then and there to act on the 

following articles, viz.: 

At 7:35 p.m. Moderator James Grimes announced that a quorum was not present, and 
it was moved, seconded and voted to postpone the meeting for fifteen minutes. At 
7:50 and again at 8:10 p.m., he made the same announcement and it was moved, 
seconded and voted to postpone for fifteen minutes. 

At 8:25 p.m. the Moderator announced that a quorum was present and called the 
Meeting to order. The quorum was 330 voters, and the final count was 341. The 
Pledge of Allegiance was led by Superintendent of Schools Richard Thompson. 



-32- 



ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer a sum of 
monies or transfer from the Federal General Revenue Sharing Account a sum of 
monies to fund supplements to the Municipal Operating Budget for FY88; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman David Player, Jr., moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum 
of $53,900 to fund supplements to the FY88 Municipal Operating budget as 
follows: 

Fire Department 

Wages $9,200 

Expenses 3,000 

Capital Outlay 1,700 

Historical Commission 

Capital Outlay 20,000 

Planning Board 

Consultants-General 20,000 

$53,900; and (2) to raise this appropriation by 
transferring the sum of $53,900 from the Federal General Revenue Sharing Account. 
Seconded. Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 2 

To see of the Town will vote to raise and appropriate and/or transfer a sum of 
monies or transfer from the Federal General Revenue Sharing Account a sum of 
monies to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid; or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectman Thomas Elliott moved that the Town vote (1) to appropriate the sum of 
$122,209.40 to pay unpaid bills incurred in prior years and remaining unpaid, 
viz: 

Fire Department 

Wages $116,908.23 

Energy Grant 

March & Martin 1,347.00 

Town Manager 

Deutch Williams 441.70 

School Department 



Margaret Bowen 


155.00 


The College Board 


300.00 


Goldberg Energy Management 


1,679.43 


Maureen Leonard 


155.00 


Mary McVann 


157.50 


The Northeast Independent 




Living Program 


225.00 


June Traylor 


52.93 


Wang Laboratories 


534.10 


•Visiting Nurses Association 




of the North Shore 


116.01 


Debra Faust 


137.50 



$122,209.40; and (2) to raise this 
appropriation by transferring the sums of $43,884.00 from the Federal General 
Revenue Sharing Account and $78,325.40 from free cash. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen, Finance Committee recommended unanimously. Unanimous voice vote. 



-33- 



ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen: (1) to 
acquire additional interests in fee or easements in various parcels of real pro- 
perty in the vicinity of Linebrook Road for highway relocation purposes by 
purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise; and (2) to convey such par- 
cels and/or easement interests, together with previously acquired parcels, to 
Essex County for roadway layout purposes; or to take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen Chairman William George moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to acquire and/or convey the following interests in the following 
parcels of real property in the area of Linebrook Road: 

In parcels 1-TS-l, l-TS-2, l-TS-3, l-TS-4, l-TS-5, l-TS-6, l-TS-7, l-TS-8, 
l-TS-9, l-TS-10, 1-TS-ll, l-TS-12, l-TS-13, l-TS-14, l-TS-15, l-TS-16, l-TS-17, 
l-TS-18, l-TS-19, l-TS-20, l-TS-21, and l-TS-22 temporary slope and construction 
easements; 

In parcels 1-DS-l, l-DS-2, l-DS-3, l-DS-4 and l-DS-5 permanent easements for 
drainage purposes; 

And to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey all of the above listed tem- 
porary slope and construction easements, permanent easements for drainage pur- 
poses, and all of the following listed fee simple interests to Essex County for 
highway layout purposes: Parcels 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5; and further, to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to acquire by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or 
otherwise, the following parcels of real property: Parcels 6 and 7. 

And further, to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey to Arthur F. Hills and 
Elna E. Hills, the following parcel: Parcel 8. 

The legal descriptions of all of the above parcels being set forth in the written 
descriptions presently on file with the Town Moderator and Town Clerk and 
available to any person present, desiring and requesting a copy, and incorporated 
in this motion and in the official record of the Town Meeting by reference; a 
plan showing the location and dimension of all of the above parcels is on display 
at the front of this Meeting and is also incorporated in this Motion and in the 
official record of the Town Meeting by reference. 

Seconded. The above is necessary for the relocation of Linebrook Road. Board 
of Selectmen unanimously recommended. The Finance Committee was 5-3 in favor, 
with Constance Surpitski mentioning the high accident rate in that area. The 
Moderator declared that the motion carried on the voice vote. 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to designate as a Scenic Road, pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15C, that portion of Linebrook 
Road running from the intersection of Mile Lane west to the Newburyport Turnpike 
(Route 1); or to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

Selectman James Engel moved that the Town vote to designate as a Scenic Road, 
pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 15C, that portion 
of Linebrook Road running from the intersection of Mile Lane west to the 
Newburyport Turnpike (U.S. Route #1). Seconded. Board of Selectmen unanimously 
opposed, feeling there was no urgency in designating Linebrook as a scenic road 

-34- 



Alice Shurcliff moved that the Town vote to petition the General Court to allow 
landowners in Ipswich to shoot deer on their land, and to contract with others 
to do so, in order to protect themselves and their families from being bitten by 
deer ticks which are spreading Lyme Disease to a degree that poses a serious 
threat to public health; such shooting to take place at times of the year other 
than the deer hunting season and to be governed by regulations to be set forth 
by the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife of the Commonwealth; and such per- 
mission to remain in force until the Commissioner of Health of the Commonwealth 
and/or the Board of Health of the Town of Ipswich decides that the public 
health menace has abated significantly. Seconded. Miss Shurcliff said that 
last year's identical bill is still in Ways and Means, and will probably die at 
the end of the year. The residents would like Bob Buell and Tim Clark to 
reintroduce it next season. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor, Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended. Daniel Mahoney spoke against article. Dr. 
Monnelly, William Wasserman, Dr. Bistrian, all residents of Argilla Road, spoke 
in favor, with Dr. Monnelly stating that Argilla Road has the highest con- 
centration of the disease and a quarter of those afflicted have long-term 
complications. Barbara Ostberg stated that the League of Women Voters has 
recently concluded a study of the problem, and urged support. The motion 
carried on a voice vote. Miss Shurcliff requested a hand count. On a standing 
count, the vote was 260 in favor, 21 opposed. 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Ipswich Housing Authority to apply 
for a State grant or grants, under the provisions of Chapter 121 B of the General 
Laws, for elderly and family housing, said grant(s) being administered by the 
Executive Office of Communities and Development; or to take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to authorize the Ipswich Housing Authority to 
apply for a State grant or grants, under the provisions of Chapter 121B of the 
General Laws, for elderly and family housing, said grant(s) being administered 
by the Executive Office of Communities and Development. Seconded. Board of 
Selectmen unanimously in favor. IHA Chairman Sara O'Connor stated that the 
Board is working on additional elderly and family units, as well as elderly han- 
dicapped units, and needs the Town's approval in order to begin studies. 
Finance Committee 7 in favor, 1 abstention. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to change the purpose of the remaining balance of 
the appropriation raised under Article 28 of the April 7, 1986, Annual Town 
Meeting from, "....repair or replace the roof of the Paul F. Doyon School and to 
undertake other repairs and/or improvements to said school," to "remodeling, 
reconstructing and/or making extraordinary repairs to schools owned by the Town 
and under the jurisdiction of the school committee, and obtaining any materiel 
and/or services incidental thereto, under the provision of Chapter 44, Section 7 
(3A) of the General Laws"; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee Chairman Jeffrey Simon moved that the Town vote to change the 
purpose of the remaining balance of the appropriation raised under Article 28 of 

the April 7, 1986, Annual Town Meeting from " remodeling, reconstructing, and 

making extraordinary repairs to the Paul F. Doyon School and to obtain any 
materiel and/or services necessary and incidental thereto" t£ "remodeling, 
reconstructing and/or making extraordinary repairs to schools owned by the Town 
and under the jurisdiction of the School Committee, and obtaining any materiel 

-35- 



and/or services incidental thereto, under the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 
7(3A) and Section 20 of the General Laws". Seconded. The School Committee 
finds it necessary to remove a tank which is leaking at the Winthrop School and 
convert the system to gas, and to repair the back driveway at the Middle School 
and install guardrails. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor, feeling it is a well 
thought out plan that will save the Town money. Finance Committee recommended 
8-0. Selectman Robert Leet, who opposed the article, stated that it was ille- 
gal; the original bond issue was for ten years, the proposed one is for five 
years. Law requires that it be for the same or greater length of time. Betty 
Siegel asked if there would be enough money, or would Town Meeting be asked for 
more; Mr. Simon said there was sufficient as far as the School Committee knew. 
The motion passed on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to design 
and develop new outdoor recreation playing fields in the general area of the 
Paul F. Doyon School; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Simon moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $22,000 
to design and develop new outdoor recreation playing fields in the general area 
of the Paul F. Doyon School, and to obtain any materiel and services incidental 
thereto. Seconded. Board of Selectmen recommended 4-1, the Finance Committee 
recommended 6-2. Ray Morley, Bruce Arbour, Kenneth Spellman all spoke in favor, 
but felt it was yery important to maintain the fields once they are built. Mr. 
Dupray did not feel that a baseball diamond could be built for $22,000. Mr. 
Simon stated that the School Department had eyery intention of maintaining the 
fields. The motion carried on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to (1) 
purchase storm drainage material and obtain services to design a storm drainage 
system; and (2) to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire storm drainage 
easements by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain, or otherwise, in the areas 
of Little Neck Road, Lakeman's Lane, Argilla Road, and Plains Road; or to take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. George moved that the Town vote to divide the questions on this Article so 
as to act on the appropriation and location of each drainage project separately. 
Seconded. Unanimous voice vote. 

Mr. George then moved that the Town vote to appropriate and to transfer from 
free cash the sum of $29,000 to purchase storm drainage material and to obtain 
services to design storm drainage system and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire storm drainage easements by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or 
otherwise, on the six parcels in the area of Lakeman's Lane, with the metes and 
bounds descriptions being set forth in the written descriptions on file with the 
Town Moderator and the Town Clerk, and available to any person present desiring 
and requesting a copy, said written descriptions being incorporated in this 
motion by reference. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor; Finance 
Committee 6-2 in favor. A two-thirds vote was necessary; the motion passed on a 
unanimous voice vote. 

-36- 



Mr. George then moved that the Town vote to appropriate and to transfer from 
free cash the sum of $300 to purchase storm drainage material and to obtain ser- 
vices to design storm drainage systems and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to acquire storm drainage easements by purchase, gift, lease, eminent domain or 
otherwise, on a parcel of land in the area of Little Neck Road, with the metes 
and bounds descriptions being set forth in the written descriptions on file with 
the Town Moderator and the Town Clerk, and available to any person present 
desiring and requesting a copy, said written descriptions being incorporated in 
this motion by reference. Seconded. Board of Selectmen 4-1 in favor; Finance 
Committee unanimously recommended, suggesting, however, that patience be exer- 
cised and eminent domain used only as a last resort. Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 11 



To see if the Town will vote to authorize the creation of a revolving fund under 
the provisions of Chapter 44, Section 53E, to be administered by the Planning 
Board, for the purposes of obtaining engineering and related services in 
reviewing and inspecting plans for construction of development projects 
in the Town of Ipswich; or to take any other action relative thereto. 

Mr. Leet moved that action on this article be postponed indefinitely. Seconded. 
Unanimous voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,427 as a 
supplement to the FY88 Recreation Department Operating Budget (Salaries) to 
increase the hours of the Recreation Director to a total of thirty-five hours 
per week; or to take any other action relative thereto. (By petition) 

The petitioner not appearing to present the article, Mr. George moved for inde- 
finite postponement. Seconded. Mr. Arbour recommended that we recognize 
Article 12 since the petitioners had brought it to the floor. Mr. Engel felt 
the article should be debated; he was against indefinite postponement, and moved 
the question. Seconded. Carried on a voice vote. The motion to indefinitely 
postpone failed on a voice vote. Mr. Engel moved that the Town vote to raise 
and appropriate the sum of $4,427 as a supplement to the FY88 Recreation 
Department Operating Budget (Salaries) to increase the hours of the Recreation 
Director to a total of thirty-five hours per week. Seconded. This has been a 
persistent issue over the past 3-4 months; he feels it always comes back to what 
Town Meeting wants to do. What we are asking of the Recreation Department and 
the Director is a fulltime committment. He urged support. Board of Selectmen 
3-2 opposed; Finance Committee, majority opposed. This is an administrative 
matter. Kenneth Spellman, Recreation Committee Chairman, stated that the 
Committee unanimously supported making it a fulltime position. James Prato, 
Nancy LaFountain, Barbara Kasuba, Ray Morley spoke in favor of a fulltime 
Director. The question was moved, seconded, unanimous voice vote. The motion 
carried on a voice vote. 

It was moved, seconded and voted to dissolve the Town Meeting at 10:14 p.m. 

And you are directed to serve this warrant by posting up attested copies thereof 
at the Post Office and at each of the meeting houses in the Town, and by publi- 
cation fourteen days at least prior to the time for holding said meeting, in a 
newspaper published in, or having a general circulation in the Town of Ipswich. 



-37- 



Given unto our hands this eighth day of September in the year of our Lord, One 
Thousand Nine Hundred and Eighty-Seven. 

Town of Ipswich 
Board of Selectmen 

William E. George, Chairman 
David S. Player, Jr. 
Robert H. Leet 
James R. Engel 
Thomas A. Elliott 



-38- 



•*•••• 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

William E. George, Chairman 

The composition of the Board was changed in April with the election of both 
Jim Engel and Bob Leet. Each quickly picked up his share of the load and began 
contributing right away. Jim is the lead commissioner in Electric Department 
matters. Bob has helped with his practical knowledge of Town government. 

It has been said that the role of the Board of Selectmen is one of solving an 
endless number of issues. Some of these issues are narrow; some have much 
broader implications. It seems that we have had an especially active year on 
the more narrow issues as our "Citizen Queries" section of the meetings indi- 
cates. We feel all were dealt with fairly— though everyone can't be happy all 
the time. 

Some of the issues of a wider concern that we have settled or are addressing at 
present are as follows: 

° Hiring Virginia Tremblay as Treasurer/Collector 

° Appointing an Affordable Housing Committee 

° Linebrook Road Relocation 

° Problems of Parking and Traffic 

° An unfortunate situation regarding beach sticker funds 

° Increased legal activity 

° Increased activity between Boards and Commissions 

The Board has maintained a cooperative yet aggressive posture in dealing with 
the Finance Committee and other Boards and Commissions where appropriate. Such 
interaction is critical especially during times of growth such as we are 
experiencing at present. 

Our goal is to be the main link in a stable, responsible government— keeping 
this government operating through strong leadership, delegation and fairness to 
the tax paying public, the administration and the operating departments alike. 

**••*• 

TOWN MANAGER 
George E. Howe 

The year nineteen eighty-seven could aptly be characterized as one in which 
water issues commanded the Town's attention much of the year. But unlike the 
issues of the 1960's and 1970' s in which shortages of supply were critical, in 
1987 the issues were of water quality and abundance. 

In April, the Town experienced flooding conditions on the Ipswich River of a one 
hundred year frequency. As a result, the Winthrop Street Bridge was out of ser- 
vice for three months. However, the Town incurred only about $12,000 in direct 
expenses' as a result of this flood and was more fortunate than many other com- 
munities. 

Drainage problems emerged requiring attention on Argilla Road at Heartbreak 
Hill, Lakeman's Lane, Plains Road, and elsewhere. Complaints about the disposal 
of snow at the Town Wharf resulted in the Town having to remove snow from the 
downtown area to the Crane Beach parking lot and/or the Town dump site. 

-39- 



Wetlands Protection Act procedures stalled progress on the Linebrook Road relo- 
cation project for the entire year. Application for a variance was petitioned 
in August 1986, yet no decision was forthcoming in 1987. Hopes to reconstruct 
Clamshell Road to provide relief to the residents of Paradise Road were all but 
lost when Mile River Sand and Gravel's proposal was deemed not a "limited 
project." 

One water project did progress well in 1987: By year's end, construction on the 
new water filtration plant was two-thirds complete. 

Health and housing issues also were of import in 1987. The Town entered into a 
contractual agreement with Beverly Hospital to provide twenty-four-hour 
emergency room coverage at its newly constructed facility; an arrangement deemed 
desirable both to the hospital and the community. The hospital once again 
sought federal assistance to recycle the old Cable building. This time with the 
Town serving as the direct applicant we were successful in obtaining a $2.2 
million Housing Development Action Grant from H.U.D. The Town switched ambu- 
lance provider to Beauport Ambulance Service. And the Town joined the 
Massachusetts Housing Partnership. 

Personnel changes also occurred during the year. The Selectmen hired 
Virginia M. Tremblay as Treasurer/Collector to replace George C. Mourikas, who 
passed away in January. Long-term superintendent of the Wastewater Treatment 
Plant, James Tebo, left for work in the private sector and was replaced by 
Timothy Henry at the turn of the year. Jaye Clark left the Manager's office' 
after having served the Town well for nearly nineteen years. 

Following the discovery of a larceny in the Recreation Department, new proce- 
dures for cash management were implemented. 

Public safety issues also were in the forefront in 1987. Roadblocks held up 
filling several police and fire positions for six to nine months of the year. A 
contract settlement was reached with the local firefighters' union, and a task 
force was formed at the end of the year to examine Fire Department facilities, 
equipment, staffing, programs, and procedures. 

In closing, I wish to thank the Selectmen, Finance Committee, and the Town staff 
for their support during this past year. 



•*•••* 



ASSESSOR'S OFFICE 

Frank J. Ragonese, Chief Assessor 

The total valuation January 1, 1987 was $552,086,995 
The valuation of the Town by class is: 



Class 1 


Residential 


$477,920,460 


86.57% 


Class 2 


Open Space 


-0- 


.00 


Class 3 


Commercial 


47,790,030 


8.66 


Class 4 


Industrial 


19,271,060 


3.49 


Personal 


Property 


7,105,445 


1.28 



The Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 1988 was $13.65/thousand. A complete revaluation 
by M.M.C., Inc., is presently in progress, and values will be implemented for 
January 1, 1988. 



-40- 



•*•••* 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Joseph Ferruzzi 

The following is a synopsis of the building construction in 

Residential 



Number of Dwelling Units 
Additions/Alterations to Dwelling Units 
Structures Other Than Dwelling Units 

(includes Pool, In/Above Ground) 
Manufactured Items 

Commercial 



Number Commercial Units 
Additions/Alterations to Commercial Units 
Manufactured Items 

Totals 

Number of Permits Issued 
Permit Fees Collected 
Estimated Construction Costs 

Plumbing and Gas 

Plumbing 
Gas 

Totals 

Number of Occupancy Permits Issued 
Certificates of Inspection 
Demolitions Issued 



iction in 


1987 


; 


Amount 




Estimated Cost 


96 

242 


$6,582,578 
3,130,422 


136 
26 




623,079 
19,952 


12 

30 

8 




5,428,070 

1,238,840 

3,450 



543 





56,447 
17,787,768 


Amount 


Fees 


175 

118 


$6,118 
4,799 


113 
48 
20 


1,130 

1,925 

443 



***•*• 

CEMETERIES, PARKS AND BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 
James E. Graff urn, Director 

General grounds work was performed in all of the Town's nine cemeteries and its 
parks and playgrounds. Thirty-two yards of infield material was spread at all 
of the ball diamonds at Bialek Park. A new fence was erected at Gil Firman 
Park. Also, a new playing surface was put down at the tennis courts at Bialek 
Park, plus new nets were installed. Court lines on the basketball and tennis 
areas were repainted. A new wooden elevated boardwalk was constructed in 
October at the Town's lot at Crane Beach. 

The main avenues in the Cowles Memorial Cemetery were hot topped. There were 
three four-grave and two two-grave lots plus five single graves sold with per- 
petual care. Awarded to veterans for use were three three-grave, five five- 
grave and nine two-grave lots plus two single graves. Twenty-one monument 



-41- 



foundations were dug and poured. Also, twenty markers were set plus twelve 
veterans markers. There were one hundred seventeen interments in 1987. 

Chapel Tent $1,750 
Sale of Lots 3,750 
Perpetual Care 5,775 
Foundations 1,868 

Interment Openings 15,500 

$28,643 

***••* 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

David R. Clements, Director 

John T. Clogston, Assistant Director 

The year of 1987 was again a busy year for Civil Defense. The Emergency 
Operating Center, located in the Ipswich Middle School, was opened eyery Monday 
evening from 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. by the staff as we are here to assist the 
public with any questions regarding Civil Defense. 

All of the units of Civil Defense continued to meet on a monthly basis for 
further training and to requalify for their First Aid and CPR certificates. The 
Auxiliary Police also qualified on the fire arms range. The (E.R.T.) Emergency 
Response Team was introduced in 1986 to Civil Defense and has proven to be a 
great asset to this department. 

As time goes on, more and more people are looking toward Civil Defense for 

assistance during local emergencies. It is at this point that our efforts are 

concentrated. We hope to make the public more aware of how to cope and be pre- 
pared for local emergencies. 

In 1986, we started the Comprehensive Emergency Plan (C.E.P.). Working along 
with State officials, the plan was completed this year; and I have three copies, 
one of which is on file at the Town Manager's office and two are on file at my 
office. 

The big event of the year for us was the historic flood which started on April 2, 
1987, and ended on April 10, 1987. The Ipswich Civil Defense put in a total 
of 216 man hours pumping out private cellars and sandbagging some of the local 
businesses. On Tuesday, April 7, the Town Manager, Police Chief and myself 
declared a state of emergency for Ipswich because of the magnitude of the 
problems. The State Civil Defense Agency was so notified. The report for this 
historic flood is some twelve pages long, is kept at my office, and is available 
for the public on Monday evenings. I will add that the townspeople can be proud 
of each of the Town departments, especially in the professional manner in which 
we all worked together for the good of the people. 

Ipswich Civil Defense is a member of the "North Shore Civil Defense Council," 
and we are often asked to assist other cities or towns during their local 
emergencies. So it was on October 31, 1987, that Beverly Civil Defense 
requested manpower to aid in a search for a missing woman feared lost in heavy 
woods. This department sent six men for a total of thirty-six man hours. 

-42- 



Along with our training programs and monthly meetings, the Ipswich Civil 
Defense is always looking for volunteers to make this an even more productive 
department for Ipswich. 

It is at this time that I would like to thank all of the other Town departments 
for their help and cooperation this past year. 

"People Helping People" 
****** 

COMMUTER RAIL COMMITTEE 
Jim Berry, Chairman 

As we ended last year's exciting chapter in the long history of Ipswich commuter 
rail, the lead stories were switched from B&M to Amtrak, the paving of the 
Ipswich parking lot, and the re-extension of service to Newburyport. With the 
few changes in dates, we could safely copy last year's report because those are 
still the lead stories for 1987. 

Amtrak took over north-side commuter rail service on January 1, 1987, and imme- 
diately had riders steaming - figuratively and literally - as service 
deteriorated in a hurry and overheated cars stayed overheated. Home-bound 
riders found themselves freezing at North Station while Amtrak crews tried to 
figure out how B&M had juggled the trains in and out; then they sweated all the 
way home as the good ol ' Budd cars made up for the cold with a vengeance. (In 
summer, you get to sweat consistently.) 

Resumption of service to Newburyport looks like a reality, but is still a few 
years off. The MBTA did hold hearings on the subject and issued its feasibility 
report in March. The Ipswich Selectmen went on record as in favor, if for no 
other reason than that the extension will mean considerable relief for the 
overcrowding in the Ipswich parking lot. 

The parking lot, a subject about which I wish I did not have to write anymore, 
is the same one we knew and hated last year. The process of obtaining funds 
from the State proved to be interminable, so the paving has had to wait until 
1988. By town meeting there should be more to report on that front. 

As if these problems weren't enough, 1987 also became the Year of the Long Ride. 
Several major bridge repairs were undertaken by the MBTA, which meant extended 
commuting times for a projected 18 months ! But loyal readers will know that 
commuters are inured to such trivial setbacks. At least the whole ride was on 
one train. 

Newer citizens may wonder whether this report is aimed at discouraging new train 
riders. Nothing could be further from the truth. Commuter rail welcomes all 
optimists, regardless of other persuasions; there is always light at the end of 
the (Salem) tunnel. Witness the fact that some of the long-awaited new cars 
actually started arriving at the end of 1987. Such tantalizing improvements, 
tossed out like bones at selected intervals, have established the rail com- 
muter's theme song once and for all: "You Keep Me Hangin' On." 



-43- 



•••••* 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Lillian V. North, Chairman 

The Ipswich Conservation Commission is a seven-member official Town board charged 
with the authority of upholding the regulations of the Wetlands Protection Act, 
Chapter 131, Section 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws. Under the provisions 
of the Act, no person may removed, fill, dredge or alter certain resource areas 
without first filing a Notice of Intent and obtaining an Order of Conditions. 
On November 1, 1987, an eighth interest was added to the Act: Wildlife Habitat, 
which means those resource areas which, due to certain physical characteristics, 
provide "important" wildlife habitat functions (i.e., "important food, shelter, 
migratory or overwintering areas, or breeding areas for wildlife"). 

The Commission meets bi-weekly and conducts an average of six to twelve on-site 
inspections per month, plus the monitoring of on-going projects, on foot and by 
aerial surveillance. 

In 1987, activity again almost doubled that of the previous year: 

1986 1987 

Notices of Intent received 24 41 

Orders of Conditions issued 21 36 

Enforcement Orders issued 4 9 

Denials issued 3 2 

Emergency Certifications 1 

Determinations of Applicability 2 

Amendments to Orders 1 3 

Extensions to Orders 1 

Certificates of Compliance 4 3 

Due to cooperation with the Building Inspector, Health Agent and the Town 
Planner, very few after-the-fact incidents occurred in 1987; and those that did 
occur were not in the jurisdiction of those three boards. 

Other than seven near-cases of frost bite on an inspection trip in February, 
and two cases of poison ivy, not to mention a few ticks randomly picked up, no 
major calamitous misadventures befell Commission members in 1987. Jim Berry, 
tracker of the elusive Cox's sandpiper, John Phillips and Donald Kent were 
appointed as the Commission's newest members, joining Lil North, Bill Barton, 
Bob Porter, Chip Nylen, and secretary, Pat Smith. A heartfelt thanks to 
outgoing members, George Hovey and David Crestin for their work, their dedica- 
tion, and last, but not least, for their humor. 



****** 



DOG AND ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER 
Harry W. Leno, Jr. 

Because of the dedication of the Ipswich Humane Society, the lives of incar- 
cerated animals have again been improved. The pet adoption service has been 
even more successful than last year. 

The ever increasing efforts to modernize the Ipswich pound has not only 
increased the well being of incarcerated animals but now stands as an asset 
to the community at large. 

-44- 



The ongoing column in the Ipswich Chronicle concerns itself with information 
about pet ownership and serves all in the community of Ipswich. The column 
contributors are reaching an ever expanding public. It is hoped that this 
effort will continue to be supported, as it provides pet information to newcomers 
in the community as well as those who wish information about pet respon- 
sibilities. 

As in the past, it is hoped that the efforts in upgrading the pound and its 
information service will have a lasting impact on the residents of Ipswich. 

During 1987 there were: 

Complaints Received 2,894 

Complaints Investigated 2,774 

Dog Bites 22 

Animals Killed by Cars 126 

Animals Killed by Dogs 4 

Dogs Picked Up 226 

Dogs and Cats Euthanised 

Dogs Returned to Owners 203 

Cat Complaints 463 

Citations Issued 148 

Patrol Hours 1,386 

Licenses 1,305 

Cats and Dogs Adopted 50 



*•••** 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Edwin R. Emerson, Chief 

An additional firefighter in 1987 brought the manning level up to four men on 
each shift for a total of 17 men, including the Chief. Drug and psychological 
testing was instituted as part of the hiring procedure for the two new permanent 
firefighters (one additional and one replacement for a retired firefighter). 

Training for permanent and call firefighers utilizing the Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire Firefighting Academies and the National Firefighting Academy 
(satellite courses) is ongoing. Training videos and manuals supplement the 
Academies. 

A new and larger water tank was installed in Engine 3. The Linebrook Station 
has new overhead doors and a new base-station radio. Its office has been 
completed and a physical fitness room is underway. Engine 6 has been updated. 
Linebrook Station equipment responded to 135 calls. 

The roster of the call firefighting force is down by six men because of a lack 
of qualified people who are interested or available. Hydrant maintenance and 
testing was minimal again this year because of unavailable summer help due to 
low wage offering. 

The Department responded to 93 bell alarms and 512 still alarms. There were 23 
motor vehicle fires, 20 structural fires, 198 investigations, 82 public assists, 
49 motor vehicle accidents, 2 boat rescues, 28 medical aid calls, 7 chimney 
fires, 60 brush fires, 15 oil burner fires, 6 false alarms, 27 hazardous 
materials responses, and 81 responses for miscellaneous calls. In addition, 
there were 1230 burning permits issued, and 244 smoke detector and 105 oil burner 
inspections made. 

Permits brought $6,200 in revenue to the Town. 

-45- 



*••**• 

HALL-HASKELL HOUSE COMMITTEE 
Vivian Endicott, Chairman 

In April, the Hall-Haskell House Committee decided to apply for a $20,000 grant 
from the Massachusetts Historical Commission. Terri Stephens was appointed Local 
Project Coordinator. In a limited time, with help from Mary Conley, Betsy Ware, 
Paul McGinley and George Howe, she had the proposal ready. There followed 
sessions with Preservation Architect, Sara Chase; Preservation Consultant, Anne 
Grady; and with Elsa Fitzgerald, Director of the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission; and another official who arrived just after the flood to see the 
house. Lyle Jensen had spent the night pumping out the cellar which continued 
to fill. Whether in spite of the sad sight or because of our persistance, 
they expressed interest in the project - but wanted the dilapidated addition on 
the back of the house which was scheduled for demolition, restored. 

This involved a new floor plan which Gray St. George, Architect and Associate 
member of our committee, promptly supplied, along with specifications for the 
work. The $20,000 was granted. 

On July 21, George Howe accepted the grant. On September 28, the plan was 
accepted. Also, the Town agreed to let us borrow $20,000 which will, of course, 
be repaid when the contracted work is complete. 

Many interested townspeople gave generously to our savings to bring the matching 
fund up to the needed $20,000. We thank you all again. 

Throughout the months of September, October, November and December, our Project 
Coordinator, Terri Stephens, was working with Town officials - State and local - 
contractors, etc. At last, on December 30, 1987, a contract was being drawn up 
for the contractor, Rene Lamarre, so that work may begin on the Hall-Haskell 
House. 

****** 

HARBORMASTER 

Armand R. Brouillette 

The Harbormaster's duties were taken over by the Chief of Police who administers 
the program and a permanent police officer who does the necessary repairs to 
floats, marks the river and maintains them, and patrols for violations. 

We had over 550 mooring permits issued, 10 serious boating violations, and reco- 
very of several stolen boats by the Harbormaster's office. Permits, fines and 
excise generated nearly $40,000 in revenue during the year. 

Two new floats were purchased for the Wharf and placed in the water, as well as 
a four-wheel drive vehicle for the patrol officer. This vehicle is also used by 
the Police Department during off -road searches and winter storm conditions. 

The patrol officer was on duty some 800 hours during the summer months. 

-46- 









****** 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Domenic A. Badolato, Jr., Health Agent 

The following is the yearly report of the activities for the year 1987: 

LICENSES AND PERMITS ISSUED : 

Food Service 57 

Retail Food 12 

Disposal Works Construction Permits 94 

Septic Haulers 9 

Septic Installers 40 

Swimming Pools 2 

Recreational Camps 2 

HEALTH INSPECTIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS : 

Food Service Inspections 240 

Full Housing Inspections 143 

No Heat Complaints 2 

Trash & Debris Complaints 48 

Insect & Rodent Complaints 11 

Perc Tests 363 

Septic Plans Reviewed 132 

Referrals from Building Inspector 10 

Referrals from Fire Department 4 

Referrals from Police Department 4 

Swimming Pool Inspections 8 

Water Testing 12 

Dye Testing 65 

Conferences Attended 12 

Health Complaints (Miscellaneous 53 
Investigated) 

FEES COLLECTED FOR VARIOUS SERVICES : 

Food Permits (Retail Food, Catering, Ice 

Cream, Bakeries, Mobile Food Service) $3115.00 

Individual Subsurface Sewage Disposal 
Systems (Perc Tests, Plan Approval, 

Septic Installers, Septic Haulers) $6380.00 

Recreational Camps $ 80.00 

Swimming Pools $ 20.00 

Miscellaneous (keeping of pigs, ice 

machines, temporary catering) $ 40.00 

****** 

Sealer of Weights & Measurers - Norman J. Bedard, Sealer 

The office of the Sealer of Weights and Measures performed numerous functions as 
required by the National Bureau of Standards, directed by the U.S. Chamber of 
Commerce; the General Laws of Massachusetts as related to Weights and Measures; 

-47- 



the rules and regulations of the State Division of Standards, now called 
"The Division of Consumer Affairs"; and the Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts 
ordinances. The testing and sealing of oil truck meters from the Town of 
Ipswich was performed in Beverly, Massachusetts, at the garage of Beverly Sealer, 
who graciously loaned and helped with all necessary equipment. 

Scales and balances, tested, adjusted and sealed 73 

Avoirdupois, apothecary and metric weights tested and sealed 78 

Scales and balances adjusted and sealed 21 

Scales and balances not sealed 8 

Scales and balances condemned 

Gasoline pump meters tested and sealed 75 

Gasoline pump meters adjusted before sealing 4 

Gasoline pump meters tested and not sealed 3 

Oil truck meters tested and sealed (vehicle tank meters) 7 

Oil truck meters (vehicle tanks) tested and adjusted before sealing... 1 

Warnings issued to oil truck drivers for broken seals in transit 2 

Leather measuring machines tested and sealed 1 

Number of breads reweighed and checked for correct weight & prices ... 30 

Number of breads reweighed and found incorrect 5 

Meats reweighed for correct weight and price 28 

Meats reweighed and found incorrect in price and weight 3 

Turkeys and poultry reweighed for correct weight and price 15 

Turkeys and poultry reweighed and repriced for correction 5 

Drug stores balances tested and sealed 3 

The personal weighers (scales) at all public schools in the Town of Ipswich were 
tested and sealed (at no cost) in the year 1987. 

Receipts of Department of Weights and Measures : 

Sealing fees received and paid to Town Treasurer for 1987 $1,259.00 

Expenditure of Department : 

Salary of The Sealer for the year 1987 2,499.96 



••••*• 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Mary P. Conley, Chairman 

The Historical Commission is able to report progress over the past year on a 
number of projects that have been under consideration for some time. 

One of these was the funding of a new survey of the Town Records. This collec- 
tion, which dates back to the founding of the Town in 1634, is in the custody of 
the Town Clerk, except for a few 18th Century documents which are stored in the 
Archives at the Library. In 1961, Thomas Barrow performed an inventory; since 
then the Records have been moved a couple of times, and we were anxious to 
ascertain the completeness of the collection at the present time. Mrs. Susan 
Keats, an experienced Archivist, carried out the survey and reorganization, 
while checking the Records against Mr. Barrow's inventory, and found everything 
accounted for with a couple of minor exceptions. Then, in a comprehensive new 
report, she listed the records and their new locations in the vaults, thereby 
making everything more accessible in a busy office. The project benefited 
greatly from the active and interested cooperation of Town Clerk, Isobel Coulombe, 
and Assistant, Fran Richards. 

-48- 



A second major project was the restoration of the prints and etchings that were 
formerly housed in the Memorial Building. The largest group of these has as 
their subject the battles of the Civil War; the others make up a miscellaneous 
group on patriotic and historic themes. The restoration work has been carried 
out by some talented people at a Newburyport firm called "Another Atmosphere" 
where the individual pieces have been brought back again to their original hand- 
some appearance. They will be exhibited early in 1988 and then hung in the Town 
Hall for Ipswich people to enjoy. The collection has become a valuable asset to 
the Town and a tangible reminder of the Town's history during the Civil War 
period. 

At the April Town Meeting, a Demolition Delay By-law was proposed by the 
Historic Subcommittee of the Master Plan Commission (Ruthanne Rogers of the 
Historical Commission was Chairman) and was accepted by the voters as being a 
modest step in the furthering of the Town's efforts at preservation. Under its 
provisions, the Town's Building Inspector delays the granting of a permit for 
the demolition of a building more than 100 years old until the Historical 
Commission reviews its historical significance. 

The Commission lost three members during the year: Barbara Emberley and Alice 
Keenan who had been members from the founding of the Commission in 1964 and 
Faith Bryan who had been a member since 1979. Our gratitude goes to them for 
the special kind of service they gave to the Town in helping the Commission 
build an understanding of the need for our preservation programs. We shall miss 
them. The new members who accepted appointment to the Commission are Susan 
Nelson, Theresa Stephens, and William Effner. We welcome them. 



****** 



IPSWICH HOUSING AUTHORITY 
Sara S. O'Connor, Chairman 

The Ipswich Housing Authority has worked in earnest throughout 1987 toward a 
common goal of providing affordable housing to the residents of Ipswich. 
Affordable housing is a critical issue both locally and nationally. The IHA has 
responded to the challenge of the times by providing new housing in the 
following areas: 

Cable Hospital 

In 1986, Raymond Daniels, Director of the Ipswich Housing Authority, began 
researching the possibility of low-income elderly housing at the Cable Hospital 
site. His hard work and effort has proven to be a success. The formulation of 
a plan to convert the hospital into low-income and market rate apartments for 
the elderly was unveiled in July 1987. The Ipswich Housing Authority, Beverly 
Hospital Corporation and the Town of Ipswich agreed to a housing plan that would 
ease the affordable housing situation in Ipswich. The outcome being the IHA 
will have twenty-eight units for lease to low-income elderly, with preference 
given to Ipswich residents. 

Mentally Handicapped Home 

The home for mentally handicapped adults will be ready for occupancy some time in 
1988. The home will have eight apartments and will house a number of Ipswich 
residents. Again, the effort to move this development along since the Board of 



-49- 



Commissions voted their approval of this necessary program in 1985 has been 
outstanding, the Authority recognizes the need for low-income housing for indi- 
viduals in difficult situations. The program for mentally handicapped adults is 
still another one of our milestones for the year. 

707 And Section 8 



The 707 and Section 8 Rental Subsidy Program is one of the little known suc- 
cesses of the IHA. To date, this program is being used by over one hundred Ipswich 
residents in need of housing assistance due to high rents and income levels not 
high enough to meet the need. The Ipswich Housing Authority has been able to 
place these individuals in the private sector through this program. The 
Authority is in a leadership role in the community so that it may continue to 
provide affordable housing to those in need. 

New Developments 

EOCD has announced a Planning Grant and a Reservation Award in the amount of 4.6 
million. This Planning Grant will allow the Authority to spend $7,500 to plan 
and coordinate the effort enabling the construction of 44 Elderly Units with a 
Handicap Section and the construction of 20 Family Units. 

On behalf of the Board of Commissioners, I would like to thank our Director, 

Raymond Daniels, and the staff for their support and teamwork that is so evident 

with all our accomplishments in 1987. They have been instrumental to all of 

this with their commitment and dedication to the housing needs of Ipswich 
residents. 



****** 



IPSWICH ARTS LOTTERY COUNCIL 
Marion W. Swan, Chairman 

The Ipswich Arts Lottery Council is the local arm of the Massachusetts Arts 
Lottery Council. Our responsibility is the selection of local projects for Arts 
Lottery Grants and support for the purchase of tickets to cultural events for 
school children under the P.A.S.S. program. Final review is made at the State 
level. Our funds are held in the Town Treasury for distribution to the grantees 
when their projects are completed. 

This year the Council held its first Art Show and Competition. Close to sixty 
Ipswich artists submitted work which was professionally judged and monetary 
awards were given. The Show was hung at the First Church in Ipswich and was 
enjoyed by hundreds of Ipswich residents. 

Prize winners were: 

Hillman Barney (first) 

Eleanor Heywood Norris and Paul Soffron (second) 

Susan K. Burton, Nancy Howard and James T. McClellan (third) 
Grantees for the 1987 calendar year were: 

Friends of Ipswich and Doyon Schools for "Mr. and Mrs. Fish Assemblies" 

Paul Soffron 

Lucy Radin 

Diane Faissler 

Patricia Ganley 

First Church in Ipswich - Organ Concert Series 

Ipswich Public Schools (P.A.S.S. Program) 

-50- 



Funding for Arts Lottery grants comes from proceeds of the Massachusetts Lottery, 
Local deadlines for applications are April 1 and October 1 for the July and 
January granting periods 

**••*• 

LIBRARY 

Eleanor M. Gaunt, Librarian 

During 1987, over 38,000 people came to the library to borrow books, records and 
books on cassette— our newest attraction! People came to the library to read 
newspapers and magazines, study, browse, attend programs and lectures, see our 
exhibits, get help with information needs, do research, get tax forms, use the 
microfilm reader/printer, use the coin-operated Apple lie, improve their reading 
with our video program, to mention just a few of the many, many reasons for a 
visit to the library. 

Total circulation of library materials reached 86,127, or 7.91 per capita; we 
added 2,598 books to the collection, of which a third were new children's books; 
132 new records and cassettes were purchased, and 836 new library cards were 
issued. We handled 16,621 reference transactions, and added an extra night of 
service during the summer, remaining open from 9-8 Mondays and Wednesdays for 46 
hours a week total. We borrowed 377 books from neighboring libraries for 
Ipswich residents to fill requests we could not meet locally. This number has 
increased by a third, as computer technology makes resource sharing a reality. 

With the valued help of our loyal volunteer corps, preparation for full automa- 
tion of the library's book circulation system continues at full speed. By 
year's end, 64% of the adult book collection had been entered in the data base, 
and 85% of the books have been bar coded with the unique, machine-readable 
labels. 

Library legislation proposed by Senator William Bulger authorizing $35 million 
for capital improvement to public libraries was enacted last year. Your 
Trustees, therefore, voted to proceed with planning for expanding the existing 
building, air-conditioning the entire building, and making it handicapped 
accessible. However, the Board learned at year's end that it would be January 
of 1990 before the construction funds would become available. The project was 
therefore put on hold. 

The library grounds received a sprucing-up and beautif ication thanks to the 
generosity of a local well-wisher; additional plantings of lilacs were 
established by the Ross Committee of the Ipswich Garden Club. 

A very generous bequest was made by the late John S. Hetnar to the library 
during 1987, interest from which is to be used for the purchase of materials 
concerning agriculture. 

The Children's Room had two "mega-programs" last year which stretched the faci- 
lities to the bursting point! The first event was the Teddy Bears' Picnic, with 
over 50 guest bears and their owners; the Little People's Halloween Story Hour 
packed the house as well. There were games and movies, a patriotic poetry con- 
test, an arts and crafts exhibit, and the heavily subscribed pre-school story 
hours. 



-51- 



It was with great sadness that the Board marked the passing of Alice Keenan, an 
active member of the Board since 1974. A multi-volume genealogical reference 
work has been donated by them in her memory. Lawrence J. Pszenny was appointed to 
fill her term, and Bette L. Siegel that of Emerson Tuttle. 

The Friends of the Library continue to lend invaluable support to the library 
with their programming for both children and adults. We salute their valued 
efforts. 

Remember— if you haven't used our library in a while, this is your information 
place, as well as your one-stop source for all your reading needs. Let us know 
how we can better serve you. 



****** 



MASTER PLAN COMMISSION 
Douglas E. Denninger, Chairman 

The Master Plan Commission, established by the October 1985 Special Town Meeting 
for a one-and-one-half year term, now asks to be continued annually at the April 
Town Meetings. Members of the Commission are appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen, Zoning Board of Appeals, Planning Board, Conservation Commission, 
Historical Commission, and the Finance Committee. 

Rather than prepare a new Master Plan e\/ery five or ten years, the Commission 
draws upon existing documents and studies to identify, recommend and implement 
changes to the Bylaws and the procedures of Town boards. A number of recommen- 
dations were adopted at the April 1987 Town Meeting including site plan review 
for non-residential buildings, demolition delay for historically significant 
structures, and increases in the density requirements in the intown residential 
areas. 

This year the Commission is analyzing techniques for preserving the natural and 
historic features along the main approaches to Town. Other projects include 
evaluating the impact of new development on municipal services, developing a 
river walk to promote access to the Ipswich River, and continuing to update and 
review the Zoning Bylaws. 

Many long evenings were spent by a number of Ipswich volunteers and the Town 
Planner. The Commission benefited tremendously from this assistance and from 
the support of the Selectmen, Finance Committee, Town Manager, Jaye Clark, and 
Jean Dauer. 

****** 

PLANNING BOARD 

William E. Bingham, Chairman 

Within the past year, the Planning Board has seen a number of changes - both in 
membership and in staffing. In August, Nora Mitchell resigned from the Board 
and Stanley Bornstein was appointed to serve the remainder of her term. In 
December, after the resignation of John Logan, Kenneth Savoie was appointed to 
serve on the Board until 1990. Mssrs. Bornstein and Savoie bring to the Board 
both engineering and architectural expertise which will be of great value. The 
Mitchell and Logan resignations were largely due to the extensive time commit- 
ment required to serve on the Board. With approximately three meetings per 
month, it is difficult to find and keep active members. 

-52- 



Staff changes have also occurred within the past year. In September, Elizabeth 
Ware celebrated her first year anniversary as Town Planner. As staff to the 
Planning Board, she has worked closely with developers, landowners, and the 
Board on all aspects of development in Ipswich. In addition to her main respon- 
sibilities to the Planning Board and the Town Manger, she has also provided 
technical expertise to a number of Town boards and commissions. In May, Terri 
Stephens was hired as Planning Assistant. Her work includes providing admi- 
nistrative and secretarial assistance to the Board, as well as researching spe- 
cific issues. 

This year has been an active year for the Board and their staff. Five sub- 
division have come before the Board. These included: Doyon (Newbury Road), 
Knox/Turner (Farley Avenue Extension), Johnson (Linebrook and Pineswamp Roads), 
Ipswich Country Club - Phase I (Newburyport Turnpike), White (High Street). 

A number of Special Permits requests have also been presented to the Board. 
They included: A. Bulger (County Road), American Gothic Trust (Argil la Road), 
Ipswich Bay Realty Trust (Colonial Drive), Depot Square Food and Spirits 
(Washington Street), Doug's Marine (High Street), First National Bank (Market 
Street), Dover Realty Trust (Mitchell Road), Creative Automotive Restyling 
(Mitchell Road), DBA Tech Auto (Mitchell Road), M. Pendexter (High Street), 
Ipswich Country Club (Newburyport Turnpike), JAS Realty Trust (Essex Road), etc. 

At the Spring 1987 Town Meeting, a Site Plan Review Zoning By-law was passed by 
the Town. As a result, the Planning Board now reviews plans for new commercial, 
industrial, municipal and drive-in structures and specific additions to existing 
structures. Since April, the Board has reviewed six projects. These develop- 
ments included: Harvey's Door and Window (Newburyport Turnpike), First 
Presbyterian Church (County Road), Old Right Road Realty Trust (Old Right Road), 
and First National Bank, Dover Realty Trust, and Doug's Marine, which were all 
site plan review/special permit developments. 



•*•*** 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Armand R. Brouillette, Chief 

The Police Department answered a total of 8110 complaints during the calendar 
year 1987. These calls generated 717 arrests for various criminal violations. 
There were summonses served and 1404 traffic citations issued, plus 1312 parking 
tickets written during the year. 

We are staffed with 23 full-time sworn police officers and one full-time civi- 
lian clerk. There is presently one vacancy in the ranks. We are experiencing 
some difficulty with Civil Service trying to fill the vacancy created by the 
Town Meeting action of April; and to date the new position is not filled. 

As reported last year, the police function is increasingly more frustrated by 
the demands on officers as mandated reporters for various inter-related state 
programs. Police are called upon to settle more social and moral issues than 
ever before. To accomplish these tasks, officers are receiving 40 hours of in- 
service training given by the Criminal Justice Training Counsel each year. 



-53- 



A breakdown of various statistics are as follows: 



Breaking & Entering 58 

Larcenies 226 

Stolen Motor Vehicles 10 

Stolen Boats/Motors 21 

Assistance Rendered 174 

Committed State Hospitals 10 

Buildings Found Open 67 

Found Items 95 

Sudden Death 20 

Threats & Assaults 147 

Protective Custody 71 

Rape 1 

Accidents with Injuries 129 



Attempted Breaking & Entering 10 

Attempted Larcenies 10 

Recovered Motor Vehicles 14 

Recovered Boats/Motors 10 

Domestic Issues 82 

Missing Persons 33 

Missing Persons Returned 33 

Lost Items 73 

Vandalism/Mischief 273 

Bomb Threats 4 

Arson 8 

Accidents 530 

Fatalities 



*•••*• 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 
Armand T. Michaud, Director 

The Public Works Department coordinates the activities of the following divi- 
sions: Public Works Administration, Highway, Forestry, Equipment Maintenance, 
Town Hall and Municipal Garage Building Maintenance, and Snow and Ice Control. 
Each division is charged with particular responsibilities relating to its 
duties. When additional manpower is required to perform specific tasks, person- 
nel are interchanged with the divisions. 

Below is a summary of the work completed by each of the Public Works Divisions: 

Snow and Ice Control 



The Public Works Divisions combine their work forces during the winter months. 
Work consists of plowing roads, hauling snow, sanding, salting roadways, filling 
sand barrels, cleaning catch basins, clearing snow away from hydrants, and 
answering miscellaneous complaints. Other personnel assisting the Public Works 
crews during the height of the snow storms were from the Cemetery and Water 
Departments. Also utilized were the services of twelve private contractors. 

Equipment Maintenance Division - Robert Hetnar, Diesel Mechanic 
All Public Works vehicles are serviced and repaired at the Municipal Garage. At 
present there are 30 pieces of motorized equipment that must be kept in good 
operating condition to insure its availability when needed. Operation cost 
records showing maintenance and gas/oil expenses on each vehicle can be ascer- 
tained from the Public Works Administration Office in the Town Hall. Also, 
minor repairs and general servicing is done to the Police Cars. 

Building Maintenance Division - Joseph Reilly, Custodian 

Routine maintenance and minor repairs were performed at the Town Hall and 

Municipal Garage throughout the year. 

Highway Division - Norman Stone, Foreman 

The Highway Division, which is the largest in the Public Works Department, is 
charged with the maintenance and repairing of the Town's streets and drainage 
systems. The winter schedule consists mainly of Snow and Ice Control and 
routine maintenance which does not require excavations. During the other three 
seasons, the men are kept busy with projects varying from road construction to 
street sweeping. 



-54- 



Normal maintenance consists of patching streets, repairing the Town's drains and 
repairing sidewalks. Granite curbing was put in on East Street. Sidewalks were 
installed on East Street and both sides of Manning Street. Various sidewalks 
were repaired. All catch basins in Town were cleaned. Several plugged drains 
were cleared. New storm drains were put in on Stage Hill Road, Plains Road, 
Applewood Drive, and Water Street. 

Guard rail was installed on Plains Road, Old Right Road, and Topsfield Road. 

The following roads were hot topped: Old Right Road, Plains Road, Leslie Road, 
Estes Street (400'), Riley Avenue (350'), and Topsfield Road. 

The following roads were stone sealed: Bayview Road, Bunker Hill Road, Capeview 
Road, Goldfinch Way, Skytop Road, Stage Hill Road, Valley Drive, and Herring 
Way. 

Street sweeping was performed twice a week in the downtown area from April to 
December. All Town roads and sidewalks were swept in the spring to rid them of 
winter sand deposits. 

Crosswalks, parking spaces, and traffic lines were painted in the downtown 
areas. As in previous years, the crosswalks were painted green. Also 142,239 
linear feet of center lines and fog lines were painted. 

Roadwide mowing was done. 

All gravel roads were graded twice in 1987. 

The Highway Division purchased one new truck in 1987 (a Ford truck with plow 
and sander). 

Chapter 90 

Topsfield Road was hot topped and Sagamore Road was partially hot topped. 

Forestry Division - Robert Comeau, Leader 

The mitigation of the Dutch Elm Disease has again been one of the principal con- 
cerns of the Forestry Division. Approximately 103 Elm trees with beetle 
infestation were removed as well as Maples, Oaks, Lindens, and Pines. 

Each first grade student was given an Ash tree to take, plant, and care for in 
observance of Arbor Day. 

The Forestry Division planted approximately 125 various types of trees around 
Town. Also, they planted several trees on High Street and Argilla Road for 
local Garden Clubs. 

Round-up was sprayed along several miles of roadside to control brush and weeds. 
Amate was used to control the spread of poison ivy. 

Other work performed by the Forestry Division consisted of trimming and pruning 
trees, removing limbs, cutting brush (major projects were along Kimball Brook, 
as well as along several roads), roadside mowing, setting up voting booths for 
election, and setting up for the Annual Town Meeting. 

-55- 



•*••** 



RECREATION AND YOUTH DEPARTMENT 
Elizabeth M. Dorman, Director 

Programs and activites continued for various age groups. For children there 
were summer playground programs, swim and tennis lessons, Halloween parade and 
program, Xmas program, vacation week activities, summer track, sand sculpture, 
and several trips (roller skating, Canobie Lake, Beverly Luau, pizza party/magic 
show, movie trip, Children's Museum), and the Hershey track competition. The 
Teenage Drop-In Center was gradually phased out and replaced by a series of spe- 
cial events and trips (pool party, Red Sox game, roller skating, Xmas shopping, 
ice skating, and dances). Trips and activities were also organized twice a 
month during the school year for special needs youngsters in our local Saturday 
Recreation Program. 

Volleyball and basketball programs continued for adults as well as tennis 
lessons, Community Band, and trips to the Boston Pops and First Night celebra- 
tions in Boston. Family events included a tree-lighting program, the annual 
Marathon, a block dance, Community Band Concert, and the Boys Choir of Douai 
picnic and concert, trips to the "Nutcracker" and a Red Sox game, and civic 
events such as the Memorial Day Parade and the July 4th Children's Parade and 
Field Day. Senior citizen activities included trips to the Flower Show, 
Burlington Mall, Science Museum and Omni Show, Lafayette Place, Freeport, Maine, 
Larry Glick Show luncheon, Bethlehem in Sturbridge, and the Pheasant Lane Mall 
as well as transportation to several nearby concerts, "nights out", and the 
Topsfield Fair. A "Seniors on the Go" variety show from Sharon, MA, was 
featured at a Golden Agers' meeting. 

Office activities included the issuing of over 5500 stickers for parking at 
Crane Beach for residents, temporary residents, horse vans, and overnight 
parking for fishermen. Over 300 permits were issued for ballfields and for ten- 
nis and basketball court use in spring, summer, and early fall. Registrations 
were handled for over 600 swim slots, numerous trips for different age groups, 
as well as the Marathon. Utilization of a department computer improved 
recording procedures and generation of forms, lists, and reports. 

Cooperation with the School Department allowed a sharing of fields and facili- 
ties; and alliances were continued with veterans' groups, senior citizens, 
youth and adult sports leagues, adult education, Scout and Campfire groups, and 
the Chamber of Commerce. Many town groups used the Memorial Building for 
meetings, registration sessions, and classes such as dog obedience and ballroom 
dancing. Coordination with the Beverly Regional YMCA facilitated on-going 
recreation offerings at their Ipswich site including the initiation of a local 
youth basketball league. 

Capital projects included a complete renovation of the lighted tennis courts at 
Bialek Park, coordination with the Cemetery and Parks Department for on-going 
fields improvement and with the School Department for the planned creation of 
new playing fields behind Doyon School. Donation of bleacher components for 
1000 spectators was secured from Boston College, some of which has already been 
utilized on the high school football field. Plans are being developed for a 
proposed new recreation building at Bialek Park with office space, storage 
areas, function room, lavatories, and a refreshment stand. 

-56- 



The Recreation Commission comprised of seven members of the Community and the 
Recreation Director met regularly throughout the year to discuss programs, 
plans, facilities, and policies. Members of the Commission helped in the super- 
vision of some recreation programs such as the Marathon, summer track, and youth 
special events. 



•**••* 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Jeffrey A. Simon, Chairman 

During 1987, the Ipswich Schools continued their forward progress in many areas. 
The tone for the year was set by a visit in March from the Carnegie Forum on 
Education and the Economy. In separate sessions over a period of two days, 
hundreds of people turned out to hear Marc Tucker, the Executive Director of the 
Forum, present the report on the future of public education. The report stimu- 
lated lively and prolonged discussion throughout the community on the best ways 
to move the system forward through continued efforts at the professional ization 
of teaching. 

At the same time, the Town welcomed two additions to the administrative team. 
Ken Cooper took over for Bill Waitt at the Doyon School. While Ken has tremen- 
dous expectations set by the educational standards established over many years 
by Bill Waitt, he brings a sense of support for a veteran teaching staff and 
ideas of his own on how to best keep the direction upward. In the business 
area, we are glad to welcome Ron Ray to the position of Business Manager. Ron 
brings experience not only from other school systems, but as a member of the 
Finance Committee and the Town Moderator in Salisbury. 

At the Winthrop School, the School Committee broke ground on the new addition in 
the spring of the year, amid what proved to be the greatest rainstorms and flood 
conditions in recent memory. Despite that, the refurbished existing portion of 
the building opened in September with all new energy efficient windows and other 
improvements; and the new addition was finished in December. Principal Alan 
Lewis and the entire staff of Winthrop deserve tremendous admiration for main- 
taining educational excellence while in the midst of a major building project. 

The Middle School showed continued progress over the last year. Test scores 
continued to improve; and the building opened last fall looking, in the opinion 
of the Committee, the best it has in years. While it is only a matter of time 
before the same population bulge which necessitated the Winthrop addition 
catches up to the Middle School, the additional attention paid to the building 
shows. Principal Ron Landman will report in detail on the year's accomplish- 
ments. It is noteworthy, however, that the academic excellence was recognized 
by the high achievement of our students at the Regional Science Fair. 

At the High School, the steady progress in academic excellence was recognized by 
the community at large, as demonstrated by the fact that more students trans- 
ferred to the High School from private schools than transferred out to private 
schools. SAT score continued their rise, with the publication of a survey of 
seven Northshore communities where Ipswich ranked second in verbal scores and 
third in math scores. Principal Steve Fortado and the staff of the school have 
done an outstanding job of consistently raising the expectations and performance 
of all students. 

-57- 



Two long-standing members of the School Committee decided not to seek reelection 
this year. Marjorie Robie, both as chairwoman and a member of the Committee set 
a standard for integrity and persistence on academic issues. Judith Mulholland 
served for many years, showing concern for progress and sensitivity to the needs 
of the students. These two members were replaced in the Town election by Norman 
Sheppard and David Pauley. 

In addition, the entire Town was saddened by the death of the senior member of 
the Committee, Tom Emery. Tom was a constant reminder to all on the Committee 
that the goal of the schools should be to prepare our students for a variety of 
life issues. Tom fought long and hard, serving as an inspiration to us all. 

The vacancy on the Committee was filled jointly by the School Committee and the 
Selectmen with the appointment of Carl Soderland to a special one-year term. 

In summary, it has been a year of great change, a year of building on the suc- 
cesses of the past with the goals of the future. The School Committee is grate- 
ful to Superintendent Richard Thompson for his excellent work, to the entire 
teaching community for their dedication, and to the people of the Town for their 
continued support and encouragement. 



****** 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Richard F. Thompson 

The reports of the school committee and school administrators clearly document 
the specific progress of the school system during the last year. Therefore, I 
would like to briefly comment to the citizens of Ipswich on that less tangible 
part of education which they support in all of our schools' activities. 

"The spirit of education is alive in Ipswich." This descriptive statement was 
chosen by Ipswich teachers to promote their scholarship fund for seniors. I 
think they were correct. We have made considerble progress during the last 
several years in our mutual attempts to develop the best schools possible with 
the resources available. Progress toward this goal occurs only when the 
teaching staff, the administration, the school committee, the parents, town 
leaders, and citizens all support the difficult steps that need to be 
accomplished. It is not a case of just more resources. Resources are 
necessary; but, resources without the commitment of these individual groups will 
prove to be an expensive and hollow shell. We need to combine goodwill and the 
determination of everyone in the community in order to continue this movement 
toward the best education we can provide. 

I want to thank all the citizens and all the members of the system for their 
past efforts; to remind you that these efforts have not been in vain, and that 
"The spirit of education is alive in Ipswich" and we are still " on the move ." 

****** 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Stephen M. Fortado, Principal 

I am pleased to submit my third annual report to the citizens of Ipswich. 

The 1986-87 school year saw some significant curriculum changes at Ipswich High 
School. The senior college preparatory English courses now offer choices bet- 
ween literature, journalism, a creative writing magazine, or speech. Junior 

-58- 



year English requires an additional weekly workshop period for S.A.T. prepara- 
tion, writing help, and vocabulary building. Enrollment in business education 
courses increased sharply due to the addition of such courses as notehand, 
marketing and management. The art room, remodeled and increased in area by 
almost 50%, now offers a much better facility for the increased numbers in our 
art courses. 

The school year also saw the start of the Kids' Room Day Care program in Room 326 
Although there were concerns whether a toddlers' care program can succeed in a 
high school, the success of the Kids' Room has dispelled those concerns. Our 
students have been accepting and supportive. 

On June 7, 1987, we graduated 131 seniors. Fifty-four percent of these grad- 
uates went on to four-year colleges, while fourteen percent went to two-year 
colleges and seven percent to other educational institutions. We continue to be 
pleased with the performance of our graduates in post-secondary schools, the 
armed forces and the workplace. 

The 1987-88 school year began on September 9 with 464 students. The declining 
high school enrollment reflects the lower numbers in the middle school grades 
that indicate continued declines in the early 1990' s. One hundred and three 
freshmen replaced the 131 graduates in 1987. A great deal of time and effort 
went into continuing improvement in our educational program in the face of these 
declines in enrollment. 

The year ended on a pleasant note when the New England Association of Schools 
and Colleges complimented Ipswich High School on the positive steps we have 
taken since the accreditation visit in 1985. Our two-year progress report was 
well-received and showed our willingness to respond positively to the recommen- 
dations of the visiting committee and continue our commitment to provide quality 
education to the young people of Ipswich. 



****** 



RALPH C. WHIPPLE MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Ronald Landman, Principal 

During the 1986-87 school year, the Ipswich Middle School provided services for 
311 students - 95 sixth graders, 108 seventh graders and 108 eighth graders. 
The program of studies continued to emphasize the education of the "total" stu- 
dent. Students received experiences that intended to facilitate intellectual, 
physical, emotional, and social maturation. For example, in the academics, 
weekly drills continued for math computation and grammar. Both these exercises 
are necessary to ensure each student the fundamentals in math and writing. For 
physical development, the physical education teachers focused on preventive 
actions with specific emphasis on AIDS, drugs, alcohol, and smoking. They also 
included exercise and nutrition as part of the physical education and health 
courses. 

Then the School's commitment to courtesy, cooperation, and consideration 
established a positive, consistent atmosphere to ensure the least possible ado- 
lescent emotional turbulence. The high rate of attendance for students and 
faculty, both exceeded 90%, confirmed the effectiveness of this commitment. The 
specialist areas, i.e., home economics, shop, music and art, involved students 
in skills and content important to enjoying life as an individual or community 

-59- 



member. The monthly dances and field trips also contributed to social matura- 
tion. The culmination was the week-long trips to Thompson Island for sixth and 
seventh grade students and to Washington, D.C., for eighth grade students. 

In conclusion, the past year's accomplishments, including test scores, students' 
attitudes, faculty involvement, and the school atmosphere, reflected another 
successful year in a continuing attempt to improve. Obviously, the parents must 
be acknowledged and thanked for their contribution and input. 

**••*• 



PAUL F. DO YON MEMORIAL SCHOOL 
Kenneth B. Cooper, Ph.D., Principal 

The 1986-87 school year was one of both continuity and change at the Doyon 
School. William E. Waitt, Jr., retired from the position as principal which he 
held so capably for more than twenty years. The selection committee of faculty, 
staff, administration and community members recommended candidates to the 
Superintendent. Kenneth B. Cooper was chosen as the new principal. 

In another major change, the opening of the addition to the Winthrop School has 
allowed two pre-school programs to move to that location providing space for 
music and art rooms at Doyon. 

New faculty members include, Gretchen May (MA in Counseling Psychology from 
Lesley College) as Guidance Counselor, Maureen Leonard (BS degree from 
Bridgewater State) in Grade 2, David Dikter (BA in Primary Special Needs from 
Wheelock College) in the Resource Room, and Robert Dean (with Masters Degree 
from both Florida State and the University of Tennessee) teaching primary music. 

Enrollment has been declining at Doyon due in part to the movement of pre-K 
programs to the expanded Winthrop School. At the close of school in December 
1987, the enrollment was at 392, and we project that to be relatively stable 
over the next year. 

The physical plant at Doyon continues to be upgraded. Last year a new gym floor 
was installed, the Grade 2 classrooms were carpeted, new sinks and bubblers were 
purchased, ground around the playground climbing structures was layered with 
sand for safety, the school sign was replaced, and we acquired new stage 
curtains. 

We are delighted that the Friends of Doyon continues to be a vital and positive 
force in the life of our school. Their contribution to our assembly program, to 
the Superthing, to the academic programs (especially the visits by guests to 
enhance science and social studies units), their volunteer work, and the systems 
of class representatives and phone-chain coordinators (new this year) are 
noteworthy and appreciated. 

The heart of the school, the academic program, remains strong by all measures. 
Our primary students are benefiting from whole language instructional tech- 
niques. They are keeping journals and are beginning to write even in kindergar- 
ten; and the staff is staying current with trends in developmental education. 
Our standardized test scores remain wery high with 100 percent of students 
passing the Massachusetts basic skills test in all subject areas (the test is 
given in Grade 3) and an average median score on the California Achievement Test 
above the 80th percentile across all grades and subjects. 

-60- 



We, the staff, do not work for test scores— we work for children. Our success 
is not measured by numbers, but by people—by the self-confidence, self- 
reliance, and competence of our students, your children. Our real accompli sh- 
ments may not be easily evaluated or immediately visible, but that does not mean 
we cannot gauge our progress, adjust our efforts, and redouble our energies to 
meet challenges. As ever, we welcome and know that we can count on all members 
of the Ipswich community as partners in this process. 

**•**• 



WINTHROP SCHOOL 

Alan L. Lewis, Principal 

The 1986-87 school year brought a change in administration to Winthrop School. 
The students, faculty and staff were yery gracious in welcoming Alan Lewis to 
the school as the new principal. 

Meetings during the year with the faculty resulted in an increased balance in 
the upper grades between a self-contained and departmentalized approach to 
instruction in some content areas. The instructional day was examined in order 
to increase time spent weekly teaching social studies and science. 

The Faculty Forum began operation during the school year. The Forum consists 
of the principal and faculty members, serving rotational ly, and is chaired by a 
faculty member. The Forum's purpose is to share in making decisions on matters 
that affect the internal operation of the school. 

Winthrop students were given the state basic skills and assessment tests during 
the school year and the California Achievement Test. Our children performed 
yery well on all the tests. 

In early spring, construction began on the addition to our school. Excavation, 
pouring the foundation for the addition and erecting the steel framework were 
accomplished prior to the end of school in June. In preparation for renovations 
to the existing building, faculty and staff packed the materials in their 
classrooms prior to the beginning of summer vacation. 

The Friends of Winthrop School, our parent group, rendered invaluable 
assistance to us by providing parent volunteers in the classrooms to aid 
teachers and children. We are grateful that our community of parents express 
their interest in our school in so many helpful ways. 

***••• 



DEPARTMENT OF SPECIAL SERVICES 
Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, Director 

Department goals addressed and accomplished during the 1986-87 school year were 
as follows: 

1. To train and supervise staff for compliance to newly issued, revised 
Chapter 766 regulations and mandated forms. 

2. Using the Needs Assessment completed May 1986, arranged a minimum of 
three inservice workshops for Special Services and regular staff. 
To provide a monthly monitoring report of tuitioned-out accounts. 



3. 



-61- 



4. To write at least one grant, other than entitlements, requesting 
funding for the 1986-87 school year. 

5. Increase communication with Special Services staff. 

This is in addition to regular Department responsibilities. 

During the 1986-87 school year, the following took place: 

New Referrals for Team Evaluations 96 

Team Evaluations that resulted in placement 79 

Team Evaluations that resulted in no placement 17 

Team Re-evaluations of individual student's Special Needs Programs 91 

Annual Review of Individual Educational Programs 280 

Screening of: 

3 years old 39 

4 years old 40 
Kindergarten 131 

Total number of Special Needs students serviced in 1986-87 336 

A grant for $10,000 written by May Reisz, Coordinator of Gifted and Talented, 
and Elizabeth J. Geanakakis, was chosen as #1 in the area of competition. This 
money was used to identify and program qualified special needs children into the 
Gifted and Talented programs. 

An Early Childhood, Special Education grant, developed with input from Susan Drumrn 
and Margaret Madeiros was approved for $5,625. 

The Pre-kindergarten Screening Committee chose a new screening instrument, "Early 
Screening Inventory." 

A new reporting and accounting system was developed to comply with the 
Massachusetts Department of Education's Discipline Policy for Special Needs stu- 
dents. (When 10 days of suspension are accumulated, present programs must be 
reviewed and possibly changed.) Letters were developed to be sent to parents by 
principals under certain conditions as spelled out in the new 766 regulations. 
Conditions are as follows: 

A. At mid-year, student presents a substantial risk of non-promotion. 

B. Will not be promoted at the end of the year. 

C. Has been suspended for more than five school days in any quarter or 
excluded from school. 

D. Has been absent without medical excuse more than 15 school days in 
any quarter. 

E. A student whose age falls between 16-21 and is planning to leave 
school without a high school diploma. 

Referrals can be made for a Team Evaluation at the Principal's discretion. 

The Department of Special Services Staff continues to strive for excellence in 
education. 



-62- 



****** 



SHELLFISH DEPARTMENT 

Philip A. Kent, Shellfish Constable 

Thomas F. Dorman, Chairman, Shellfish Advisory Board 

The shellfish beds of the Town and those of other adjoining towns have been 
depleted by a heavy infestation of the green crab. Most attempts to reduce the 
green crab population have not been highly successful, although some selective 
methods are being tried. Because of this problem, the number of commercial 
clammers and the level of recreational clamming has been reduced. Many 
"old-timers" claim that the recent 6 to 7 warm winters has helped the green crab 
to flourish; and since it (the green crab) is the primary predator of the soft- 
shelled clam and the blue mussell, it is inevitable that these shellfish will be 
adversely affected. 

The main thrust of the department has been in the area of research. Mike Hickey 
did a survey of our flats and was the first to point out to us that the green 
crab was our biggest problem. Dr. Stewart Jacobson from the University of 
Massachusetts has been working with us for the past two summers utilizing 
experimental seed boxes and special protective netting devices to protect the 
experimental areas from predators. He will continue to assist us with technical 
data and an overall plan for improvement of our areas this spring. 

During 1987, over 200 bushels of green crabs were caught in traps and destroyed 
by the constable, Philip Kent. We anticipate that our efforts in shallow water 
crabbing will increase this year, especially in those areas near seed beds. The 
technical information we will be getting from Dr. Jacobson in February will 
determine the intensity of this project. 

The concept of limits has been imposed on commercial clammers, as the daily 
limit of two bushels has moderated the overall intensity of commercial digging. 
The Ipswich River was utilized for 8-9 weeks during the early spring, but was 
closed in May for conservation reasons. At this point in time, no major 
seeding has taken place in our overall areas. The constable has performed a 
comprehensive survey to evaluate all areas. We will do this type of survey 
twice a year (spring and fall). 



****** 



TOWN CLERK 

Isobel N. Coulombe 

1987 Population: 11,645 

Comparative Vital Statistics recorded in the past four years: 

1984 1985 1986 1987 

Births ~I43 ~l43 ~T36 ~T39 

Deaths 107 102 131 128 

Marriages 83 88 107 104 

There were 68 females and 71 males born to Ipswich residents in 1987. Of the 
total number of deaths recorded (57 males, 71 females), 121 were residents; the 
oldest resident was 105 years old, the youngest was 29 years old. Of the 104 



-63- 



503 


657 


661 


49 


53 


60 


455 


597 


581 


22 


25 


26 



113 


134 


81 


74 


47 


33 


13 


14 


74 


58 


19 


22 


23 


4 


1413 


60 



marriages recorded in Ipswich, 41 took place elsewhere; in 35 marriages, one 
party was a non-resident; in 18, both parties were non-resident. 

DOG LICENSES 1985 1986 1987 

Males 

Females 

Spayed Females 

Kennels 

1029" 1332 - 1328" 

The 1987 Census found 1390 dogs in Ipswich. 

SHELLFISH LICENSES & PERMITS 1986 1987 

Resident Yearly 

Resident Family 

Resident Commercial 

"Over 60" Resident Recreational 

Non-resident Yearly 

Non-resident Daily 

Non-resident Commercial 

Non-resident Comm'l Rack Tickets 

1773 399 ($7832) 

Town Elections: 

The Annual Meeting for the Election of Town Officers was held in accordance with 
the Warrant on Monday, April 13, 1987, from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. The ballot 
box in Precinct 1 registered 545 b;"! lots cast; in Precinct 2, 524; in Precinct 3, 
468; in Precinct 4, 500; for a total of 2037 votes cast in the four precincts 
out of 7005 registered voters. The new precinct boundaries, based on the 1985 
State Census, became effective with the Annual Meeting/Election. 

***••• 

TOWN COUNSEL 
Charles C. Dalton 

The year 1987 was an unusually active, if not hectic, year for the Legal 
Department. The Zoning Board of Appeals continued to generate a steady volume 
of judicial appeals, with two cases involving Philip Ross and Edward Sweeney 
developing into major cases. 

The formerly quiesent Planning Board and Planner caused an almost unprecedented 
volume of judicial appeals in 1987, breaking a peaceful period of several years 
of quiet landowner - development - planning - dispute resolutions without judi- 
cial intervention. 

Real estate conveyancing activities were relatively minor in nature and in 
volume. Personnel matters, with one notable exception - Norman F. Stone - were 
resolved amicably and without resort to the Courts. An unfortunate incident 
involving missing funds in the Recreation Department briefly involved the 
District Attorney's Office and the procedures of the criminal law in the Town's 
affairs. The Building Inspector issued an unusally large quantity of Cease and 
Desist Orders in his efforts to enforce the Zoning By-law; most such orders were 
obeyed without court action. 

Meetings were continually held with several department heads on an irregular 
basis in a constant attempt to avoid unnecessary lawsuits and to reduce 
conflicts with Town citizens without undue expense to the taxpayer and delay. 

-64- 



*•*•** 



ACTING TREASUER-COLLECTOR 
Sophie Rygielski 

A Record of Trust Fund transactions was maintained. A schedule of receipts was 
rendered to the Town Accountant monthly. 

The Treasurer's Office is the nerve center of the Town and must accept all 
responsibilities under the General Laws of Massachusetts. 

The following bills were sent out: 

Personal Property Farm Animal Excise 
Real Estate Sewer Betterment 

Motor Vehicle Excise Boat Excise 

Check register balances were reconciled with bank statements. 

All disbursements, both Town and School, were processed through this office, 
and all receipts were deposited and faithfully recorded. 



•*•*•* 



WATER/SEWER DEPARTMENTS 
James E. Chase, Engineer 

Water Division 

Gilbert J. Elliott, Foreman 

Construction of the Town's new 2.5 million gallon per day Filtration Plant at 

the confluence of Bull Brook and Dow's Brook Reservoir continues. 

Completion is expected in July, 1988. 

The following extensions to our distribution system were added in 1987: 
Essex Road 575' - 10" PVC 

Drumlin Road 1775' - 10" PVC 

The Fairways 1450' - 10" PVC 

Country Club Way 3900' - 8" PVC 



1985 1986 1987 



New Meters Installed 
Meters Replaced 
Services Turned Off 
Services Turned On 
New Services 
Services Discontinued 
Hydrants Installed 
Hydrants Replaced 
New Water Mains Installed 
Total Length of Mains 

Water Services 
Metered Services 
Unmetered Services 
Summer Services 



52 




46 


114 


85 




98 


109 


83 




77 


56 


93 




118 


154 


34 




148 


76 


3 




2 


4 


5 




31 


13 










1 


8,285' 


14 


,065' 


7,700' 


19,245' 


433 


,310' 


441,010' 


3,616 


3 


,662 


3,776 


72 




70 


109 


71 




71 


15 



-65- 



Water Usage 
Dow's Reservoir 
Brown's Wei 1 
Winthrop Wells 
Mile Lane Well 
Essex Road Wei 1 
Fellow's Road Well 
Total Water Usage 



119,779,000 
47,660,200 
28,729,500 
15,413,000 
14,445,400 
23,592,300 

249,619,400 



82,249,000 
76,932,000 
30,300,000 
18,574,000 
21,766,000 
28,139,000 
257,960,000 



25,754,000 
103,760,000 
58,172,000 
30,781,000 
55,505,000 
45,702,000 
319,674,000 



Highest Day: 12/05/85 1,593,000 
Highest Day: 2/08/86 
Highest Day: 7/20/87 

Sewer Division 

Timothy Henry, Chief Operator 



1,523,000 



2,413,000 



1985 



1986 



1987 



Sewage Treated Daily 
(Average Gallons) 

Total Sewage Treated 
(Gallons) 

Septage (Gallons) 



1,125,000 1,386,000 

410,985,000 506,326,000 
242,400 



Highest Daily Flow: 9/06/85 
Highest Daily Flow: 4/20/86 
Highest Daily Flow: 4/06/87 

Total Precipitation (Inches) 

Highest Daily Prec. 8/30/85 
Highest Daily Prec. 6/05/86 
Highest Daily Prec. 4/04/87 

Treatment 

Average Influent Suspended 

Solids mgl 
Average Effluent Suspended 



2,138,000 

42.05 
3.30 



2,641,000 



50.85 



2.85 



94 



81 



1,145,000 

417,925,000 
485,500 



2,568,000 
51.35 

4.25 

70 



Solids mgl 


4.2 


3.6 


3.3 


Average Percent Removal, S.S. 


96 


96 


95 


Average Influent BOD5 mgl 


143 


135 


121 


Average Effluent BOD5 mgl 


6.5 


8.6 


7.4 


Average Percent Removal BOD5 


95 


94 


94 


Average Effluent pH 


6.5 


6.9 


6.9 


Sludge Dewatering 








Digested Sludge to Vacuum 








Filters (Gallons) 


2,045,700 


2,348,300 


2,122,100 


Average Digested Sludge 








Percent Solids 


2.2 


2.2 


2.2 


Vacuum Filter Sludge Cake to 








Disposal (Pounds) 


341,000 


425,688 


375,055 


Average Vacuum Filter Sludge 








Cake % Solids 


11.4 


11.8 


11.4 



-66- 



Chemicals 




Disinfection: Total Chlorine 




(Pounds) 


7,080 


Sludge Dewatering: 




Lime (Pounds) 


78,156 


Ferric Chloride (Pounds) 


32,632 


Collection System 




New Sewer Connections 


11 


Total Sewer Connections 


1,424 



7,836 5,475 

98,060 86,958 
28,412 25,454 



40 25 

1,464 1,489 



****** 



WHITTIER REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
Eugene A. Hailson 

Over the past three years, we have made great progress at the school. We have 
reconfigured personnel assignments to make program administration more effec- 
tive. A new athletics director and business manager have been hired, and some 
responsibilities have been redistributed. 

Curriculum in academic and vocational areas is undergoing reevaluation, and 
changes will be made where necessary. A vocational advisory board has been 
reactivated and has found a positive reception. We are considering proposals 
for addressing some problems with the plant (problems which have resulted from 
previous poor planning and construction). 

Whittier is a school on the rise. I believe in it and in its potential. 

****** 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

James Theodosopoulos, Chairman 

In 1987, 112 petitions were presented to the Zoning Board, a new record. The 
previous high was 106 petitions in 1986. There were 72 requests for Special 
Permits of which 63 were granted. There were 21 requests for Variances of which 
eight were granted. Of three appeals from the Building Inspector's decisions, 
one was affirmed and two were reversed. Two comprehensive permits under Chapter 
40B, Section 20 were granted. Nine petitions were withdrawn or dismissed. 

During the year, James Theodosopoulos was reappointed as a regular member for a 
five-year term, and John R. Verani and Joseph R. Petranek were reappointed as 
associate members for a one-year term. Toward the end of the year, Mary Fosdick 
resigned and was replaced by Douglas Denninger. 

****** 

ELECTRIC. DEPARTMENT 
Donald R. Stone, Sr. 

In 1987, we saw an increase in the number of electrical services of 117, bring- 
ing the total number of residential, municipal, business and commercial customers 
to 5,584. Generation at the Power Plant reached a ten year high when we 
generated just over 7,000,000 KWH's. The generation capacity of the Power Plant 

-67- 



was increased in 1987 when a larger, more efficent engine was installed. The 
Distribution continued a maintenance and upgrade program that has been 
established over the last four years. In 1987, Ipswich sold 85,498,796 KWH's, 
an increase of 5.9%. A recent study of municipal electric companies in 
Massachusetts showed that our residential customers had the lowest average rate 
in the state. The year 1987 also was the year that the Electric Department 
began taking over the reading and processing of the Water and Sewer bills. 

*••••* 

GOVERNMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 
Peter J. Dziadose 

At long last, 1987 was the year that the Government Study Committee finally 
received a charge from the Board of Selectmen after a three-year lapse. This 
momentous charge, or should I say the ongoing five-year question regarding the 
Town Meeting quorum, was once again the target of concern from the Board. This 
ever so endless, debatable question has eluded the Board for many years and has 
been the Committee's main topic throughout the past. It was decided by fellow 
members that this charge would be the last one concerning the quorum, complete 
with a new set of recommendations that will be required to once and for all 
settle this charge. 

The Committee has reported to the Selectmen in great detail a final analysis 
complete with questionaires, moderator questionaires, Townspeople comments, 
charts and graphs, and six recommendations that the Committee strongly advised. 

At this year's Town Meeting, you will see a start in the right direction in con- 
junction with our report. The changes that will be proposed at the meeting, in 
which passage will be required, should finally settle this ongoing debate that 
has stifled the Townspeople and the eager committee members. 

*••*•* 

TOWN OF IPSWICH 
REVENUE SHARING HANDICAPPED REGULATIONS 

This notice is published pursuant to the requirements of Section 51.55 of the 
Revenue Sharing Regulations, as published in the Federal Register on October 17, 
1983. Section 51.55 prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals 
because of their handicapped status. 

The Town of Ipswich, Massachusetts, advises the public, employees and job appli- 
cants that it does not discriminate on the basis of handicapped status in 
admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and 
activities. 

The Town of Ipswich has designated the following (person or office) as the con- 
tact to coordinate efforts to comply with this requirement. Inquiries should be 
directed to: 

Name: George E. Howe 
Office: Town Manager 
Address: Town Hall, South Main Street 
Phone Number: 356-4848 

Hours: 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. Mondays 

8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tues.-Thurs. 
8 a.m. - 12 noon Fridays 



-68- 



FEOFFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 



Balance, July 2, 1986 
Cash Received 
Expenditures 
Balance, June 30, 1987 



Little Neck valued at 
Buildings - Community Center and Barn 
Cash in First National Bank of Ipswich 
On Deposit - Ipswich Cooperative Bank 
On Deposit - Ipswich Savings Bank 



12,734.75 
240,524.85 
227,458.22 

25,801.38 



5,462,080.00 

20,410.00 

25,801.38 

2,000.00 

1,202.54 

$5,511,493.92 



SCHEDULE I 

CASH RECEIPTS 

July 1, 1986 - June 30, 1987 



Buildings and Land Taxes 

Rents 

Late Payment Interst & Miscellaneous 



184,521.30 

55,390,01 

613.54 

$240,524.85 



SCHEDULE A 
RECONCILIATION OF CASH RECEIPTS 



Balance, July 1, 1986 
Cash Receipts - Schedule I 

Expenditures - Schedule II 





SCHEDULE II 






EXPENDITURES 






July 2, 1986 - June 30, 


1987 


Taxes - Town of Ipswich 






Repairs and Upkeep 






Water 


7,121.88 




Wharf 


350.00 




Playgrounds 


1,145.00 




Tree Work 


6,413.00 




Community Center 


1,600.00 




Hot topping 


725.00 




Maintenance 


2,000.00 





12,734.75 

240,524.85 

253,259.60 

227,458.22 

$ 25,801.38 



190,619.05 



19,354.1 



-69- 



FEOFEES OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL 
(Continued) 

Schedule II (Continued) 

Salaries & Expenses 

Salaries 4,200.00 

Transportation 1,800.00 

Police 3,483.07 

Office Supplies 372.75 

Meetings & Dinners 302.08 

Telephone 164.39 

Interest 2,162.00 

Insurance 5,000.00 17,484.29 

$227,458.22 



-70- 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENTS OF FUND ACTIVITY 

December 31, 1986 to June 30, 1987 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 

BALANCE RECEIVED DECEMBER 31, 1986 

Building Fund 
Augustine Heard Fund 
Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 
Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 
Abby L. Newman Fund 
George Spiller Fund 
Daniel Treadwell Fund 
Wales Endowment Fund 

INTEREST INCOME: 

Ipswich Savings Bank 

Building Fund 
Augustine Heard Fund 
Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 
Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 
Abby L. Newman Fund 
George Spiller Fund 
Daniel Treadwell Fund 
Wales Endowment Fund 



$15,963.57 

11,522.58 

1,260.28 

600.14 

3,600.81 

1,020.23 

25,865.79 

180.04 



692.08 

499.55 

54.64 

26.02 

156.11 

44.23 

1,121.38 

7.80 



$60,013.44 



2,601.81 



BALANCE ON HAND JUNE 30, 1987 

Building Fund 
Augustine Heard Fund 
Elizabeth R. Lathrop Fund 
Adelade B. Lockhart Fund 
Abby L. Newman Fund 
George Spi Her Fund 
Daniel Treadwell Fund 
Wales Endowment Fund 



16,655.65 

12,022.13 

1,314.92 

626.16 

3,756.92 

1,064.46 

26,987.17 

187.84 



$62,615.25 



-71- 



TRUSTEES OF THE IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STATEMENTS OF FUND ACTIVITY 

December 31, 1986 to June 30, 1987 

BOOK FUND AND MEMORIAL FUNDS 

BALANCE ON HAND DECEMBER 31, 1986 $2,718.99 

CONTRIBUTIONS: 
Book Account $ 448.89 

John S. Hetnar Fund 10,000.00 10,448.89 

INTEREST INCOME: 

Ipswich Savings Bank 73.54 

Lynn Five Savings Bank 66.55 

Other 2.52 142.61 

PURCHASES: 

Books (668.85) 

Table (279.40) 

Plaques (18.35) (966.60) 

BALANCE ON HAND JUNE 30, 1987 $12,343.89 

IPSWICH SPEAKS FUND 

BALANCE ON HAND DECEMBER 31, 1986 $ 909.46 

INTERST INCOME: 
Fidelity Cash Reserves 26.35 

BALANCE ON HAND JUNE 30, 1987 $ 935.81 



-72< 



BURLEY EDUCATION FUND 
BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1987 $25,170.12 

INCOME FROM FUNDS FOR YEAR 1987 AS FOLLOWS: 

Interest: Ipswich Co-Operative Bank 

Money Market Certificate 1,648.17 

BALANCE ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1988 AS FOLLOWS: 

Ipswich Co-operative Bank Money Market Certificate $26,818.29 



-73- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUNDS AND ACCOUNT GRCUP3 

JUNE 30, 1987 

ACCOUNT 
GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 3R0UP 



EXHIBI 



jTALS 



LIABILITIES I FUND EQUITY 



i 



LIABILITIES; 
WARRANTS PAYABLE 

PAYROLL DEDUCTIONS PAYABLE 103,461 
OTHER LIABILITIES 
DUE TO OTHER FUNDS 
UNCLAIMED CHECKS 
NOTES K BONDS PAYABLE 
DEFERRED REVENUE 



rOTAL LIABILITIES 



- 

£.400 

24,684 



cm, m 



SPECIAL REVENUE ( MEMORANDUM 

PROPRIETARY LONG-TERM ONLY ) 

REVENUE CAPITAL SPECIAL FUND DEBT 

GENERAL SHARING OTHER PROJECTS ASSESSMENT TYPES GROUP 6/30/37 i/38/ 



fl - 



$326,408 
15,193 



?9 . 939 



5.09! 



3,213,500 
807,918 1.045,100 






- o - 


$326 : 4o8 


150? 




103,461 


t»\ 




17,593 


f 




29 . 939 


8 C 




24,664 


2^ 


30,000 


8,333,500 


1,05- 


- - 


i APT IL? 


1,65= 


30,000 


1A 033 OA"? 


3,350 



FUND EQUITY: 
UNRESERVED RETAINED EARNINGS 



'95,550 



, 1 7 j , j v. 



: UND BALANCES; 
RESERVED FOR ENCUMBRANCES 215,030 
RESERVED FOR EXTRAORDINARY 

AND UNFORSEEN EXPENDITURES 1,449,152 
RESERVED FOR GRANTS 
RESERVED FOR APPROPRIATIONS 
REVOLVING FUNDS 
RESERVED FOR EXPENDITURES 
UNRESERVED: 

DESIGNATED 

UNDESIGNATED 

TOTAL FUND EQUITY 



487,583 






130,140 
53,74! 

172,278 
16,529 



;2S.382 



IfVW.ttft 170,786 27,352 2,069,693 7E. 210 (141,651 

3,152,086 170,786 400,034 2,113,312 7?, 210 1,782,331 



1,579,298 

53,74: 

172,272 
16,589 

427-583 



d, £<*/,&< 



hit 



lvSM 
5?9- 57 

ll :: 

879* 



,6Vy,H;;V 



iGTAL LIABILITIES AND 
FUND EQUITY 



$3,437,375 $170,786 $400,034 $7,203,318 $310,067 $6,332,582 $30,000 $17,984,156 $7,0"3): 



-74- 



ASSETS 



■ESTMENTS 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 

COMBINED BALANCE SHEET - ALL FUNDS AND ACCOUNT GROUPS 

JUNE 30, 1987 

ACCOUNT 
GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES GROUP 



EXHIBIT 1 



r OTALS 



SPECIAL REVENUE ( MEMORANDUM 

PROPRIETARY .ONG-TERM ONLY ) 

REVENUE CAPITAL SPECIAL FUND DEBT 

GENERAL 3HARIN6 OTHER PROJECTS ASSESSMENT TYPES GROUP 6/30/97 6/30,86 



($678,396) $66,177 $400,034 $1,813,312 $102,315 $2,080,672 - - 
3,970,614 104,609 300,000 



$3,784,114 $1,377,865 
$4,375,223 S,912,&98 



:EIVA3lES: 




AXES 


439,707 


XCISES 


372,744 


A* LIENS 


(35,736 


EPARTMENTALS 


26,633 


SER CHARGES I LIENS 




PORTIONED SPECIAL 




ASSESSMENTS 




USPENDED SPECIAL 




ASSESSMENTS 




OMMITTED INTEREST 




ROVISION FOR ABATEMENTS 




I EXEMPTIONS 


(613,295 


CCRUED INTEREST 


- - 


AYROLL ADVANCES 


- - 


UE FROM OTHER GOVERNMENTS 


- - 


AX FORECLOSURES 


5,104 


MOUNT TO BE PROVIDED FOR 




PAYMENT OF NOTES I BONDS 





361 


15,844 




1,040,566 


215,416 




4,431 




(12,456) 





439,707 456,4 32 

372,744 455,425 

( 19 ,531 ) 2,466 

lu lOdg j ■ , .'0 j 

1,040,566 797,558 

215,416 123,368 



4,431 

02,456) 



4,431 
(5,3791 



5,090,000 



3,245,500 



(613,295) (187,686! 



150 



5,104 5,104 

30,000 8,365,500 1,091,700 



AL ASSETS 



$3,487,375 $170,786 $400,034 $7,203,312 $310,067 $6,382,53? $30,000 $17,984,156 $7,073,903 



-75- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1987 



EXHIBIT 2 



GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 



rCTALS 



REVENUES; 
TAXES 
TAX LIENS 

MOTOR VEHICLE I OTHER EXCI! 
PENALTIES AND INTEREST 
IN LIEU OF TAXES 
LICENSES AND PERMITS 
DEPARTMRNTAL 
INTERGOVERNMENTAL 
EARNINGS ON INVESTMENTS 
FINES AND FORFEITS 
NOT OTHERWISE CLASSIFIED 



GENERAL 



$7,129,426 

64,901 

569,279 

38,844 

135,762 

150.160 

111,807 

3,101,226 

435,563 

55,531 

13,355 



TOTAL REVENUE 


11,810,854 


EXPENDITURES? 




GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


1,895,000 


PUBLIC SAFTEY 


1,444,784 


EDUCATION 


5,965,173 


PUBLIC WORKS 


i^O CJC.-C 


SANITATION 


133,888 


OTHER SERVICES 


652,829 


DEBT PRINCIPAL 


265,000 


DEBT INTEREST 


19,517 


CAPITAL OUTLAY 





REVENUE 
SHARING 



SPECIAL 
REVENUE 



CAPITAL 
PROJECTS 



SPECIAL 
ASSESSMENT 



(MEMORANDUM ONLY) 
6/30/87 6/30/8i 



o - 



$7,129,426 $6,974,028 



135,234 
13,396 



148,630 



258,003 - - 
454,519 878,658 
621 

4,615,000 

713,143 5,493,658 



4,700 

12,172 

587,424 



69 , 306 



64,901 


95,122 


569,279 


623,516 


38,844 


73,166 


135,762 


186,028 


150,160 


90,073 


369,810 


611,385 


4,569,637 


3,487,101 


449,530 


251,945 




42,726 


4,702, d6x 


708,950 



69,306 18,235,591 13,144,540 



802,612 



94,304 



9,669 



fOTAL EXPENDITURES 



-.0,144 



2,735,294 
202,612 698,600 2,744,963 



1,899,700 


i,57 i »,:'4H 


1,456,956 


1,349,030 


6,552,597 


6,225,429 


673,953 


672,105 


336,500 


498,589 


net QAg 

'3o,3VC 


628,709 


£65,000 


84,000 


19,51? 


11,554 


2,735,294 


1,641,468 



,4,696,31? 12,665,228 



EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUE 
OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES 



$760,710 ($53,982) $14,543 $2,748,695 $69,306 $3,539,272 $459,312 



-76- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1987 



EXHIBIT 2 



GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYRES 



TOTALS 



REVENUE SPECIAL CAPITAL SPECIAL MEMORANDUM ONLY' 

GENERAL SHARING REVENUE PROJECTS ASSESSMENT 6/S0/37 6/30/36 



OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES); 
OPERATING TRANSFERS IN $233,355 - - 

OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT (354,511) <1?E,hh6 ■ 



STATE AND COUNTY CHARSES 

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING 
SOURCES (USES) 



(378,241) - - 
(499,397) (19E.W6) 



- Q - 

- o - 

- - 



- - 233,355 $132,502 
(40,909) (587,366) - - 

- - (378,2*1) (227.593) 







(Art OAO'i ''7'J? 7 C iJM ' U c - '1911 



EXCESS OF REVENUES AND OTHER 
SOURCES OVER (UNDER) EXPEND- 
ITURES AND OTHER USES 261,313 (246,426) 14,543 2,748,695 28,397 2,806,520 414,221 

FUND BALANCE JUL* 1, 1986 2,890,773 417,214 385,491 (635,383) 43,813 3,101,908 2,687,756 

FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 1937 $3,152,036 $170,786 $400,034 $2,113,312 $72,210 $5,v08,423 $3,101,977 



-77- 



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-79- 



EXHIBIT 4 



TOHN OF IPSHICH, MASSACHUSETTS 
COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES I CHANGES IN 
RETAINED EARNINGS - ALl PROPRIETARY FUND TYPES 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1937 

PROPRIETARY FUND TVPE 

TOTALS 

SEWER WATER ELECTRIC 6/30/3? 



OPERATING REVENUES: 

USER CHARGES $169,705 $644,370 $6,146,336 $6,960,911 

LIENS 14,084 37,331 13,595 65.510 

SALE OF ASSETS - - - - 18,849 16,849 

TOTAL OPERATING REVENUES 183,739 638,201 6,179,830 7,045,870 

0FERATIN3 EXPENSES: 
MAINTENANCE I OPERATION 

SALARIES 158,609 168,472 609,883 530,364 

EXPENSES 868,081 144,570 4,630,967 5,043.618 

PLANT i INVESTMENT - - 94,746 - - 94,746 

CEPECIATION - - - - 169,683 169,683 



TOTAL OPERATING EXPENSES *Ev,690 '♦07,788 5,409,933 b,d36,*ll 

OPERATING INCOME <LCS3) (836,901) 874, 4i3 769,347 806,859 



OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 
OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 354,511 35*,51i 

OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 0-0 



TOTAL OTHER FINANCING 

SOURCES (USES) 354=511 354,511 

NET INCOME (LOSS) 117,610 87*, 413 769,347 1,161,370 

FUND BALANCE 
JULY 1, 1936 (70,661) 489,886 261,846 621,011 



JUNE 30, 1987 $46,949 $704,839 $1,031,193 $1,782,381 



-80- 



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-81- 



im OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS EXHIBIT 6 
COMBINED STATEMENT GF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES I, CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE 
ALL SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1987 

TOTALS 
OTHER SPECIAL — - 

REVENUE REVENUE (MEMQRANDOM ONLY) 

REVENUES SHARING CAFETERIA FUNDS JUNE 30, 1987 JUNE 30,1986 

NON ENTERPRISE CHARGES FOR SERVICES - - $199,476 $56,527 $258,003 $275,111 

INTERGOVERNMENTAL 135,234 76,839 377,630 569,753 568,685 

EARNINGS ON INVESTMENTS 13,396 - - 621 U,017 17,180 

TOTAL REVENUES 1*6,630 276,365 436,778 861,773 860,976 

EXPENDITURES 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT - - - - 4,700 4,700 25,068 

EDUCATION - - 275, 438 311,986 587, 484 553,538 

SANITATION 808,612 - - - - 202,612 134,089 

OTHER SERVICE - - - - 106,476 106,476 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 202,612 275,438 423,162 901,212 762,695 

EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER 

(UNDER! EXPENDITURES (53,982) 927 13,616 (39,439) 98,281 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 

TRANSFERS IN 

TRANSFERS OUT 192,446 192,446 (401) 

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) (192,446) (192,446) (401) 

EXCESS OF REVENUES AND SOURCES 

OVER(UNDER) EXPENDITURES & USES (246,428) 927 13,616 (231,885) 97,880 

FUND BALANCE JULY 1, 1986 417,214 (20,715) 406,206 802,705 704=825 

FUND BALANCE JUNE 30, 1987 $170,786 ($19,768) $419,822 $570,820 $602, '05 



-82- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH, MASSACHUSETTS 
NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 
June 30, 1987 

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies 

The accounting policies for financial reporting purposes of 
the Town of Ipswich conform to generally accepted accounting 
principles for local governmental units except as indicated 
in note 2. 

A. Fund Accounting 

The Town reports its financial activities in several 
funds and one account group in order to comply with the 
limitations and restrictions placed on both the re- 
sources made available to the Town and the services pro- 
vided. The various funds are grouped in the financial 
statements in this report into six generic fund types 
and three broad fund categories as follows: 

GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

General Fund 

The general fund is the general operating fund of the 

Town. It is used to account for all financial resources 

except those required to be accounted for in another 

fund. 

Special Revenue Fund - General Revenue Sharing 
This special revenue fund is used to account for the 
proceeds of the State and Local Fiscal Assistance Act 
and their expenditures as prescribed by the Office of 
Federal Revenue Sharing. 

Special Revenue Funds - Other 

This special revenue fund is used to account for the pro- 
ceeds of specific revenue resources (other than general 
revenue sharing, expendable trusts of major capital pro- 
jects) that are legally restricted to expenditures for 
specified purposes. 

Capital Projects Fund 

The capital proj ects funds are used to account for 
financial resources to be used for the acquisition or 
construction of major facilities (other than those 
financed by proprietary funds and trust funds) . 

PROPRIETARY FUND 

Sewer - Water - Electric Funds 

Sewer, Water, and elect ic funds are used to account for 
operations (a) that are financed and operated in a manner 
similar to private business enterprises - where the in- 
tent of the governing body is that the costs of providing 



-83- 



goods or services to the general public on a continuing 
basis be financed or recovered primarily through user 
charges; or (b) where the governing body has decided 
that periodic determination of revenues earned, expenses 
incurred, and/or net income is appropriate for capital 
maintenance, public policy, management control, account- 
ability, or other purposes where all financial transactions 
are maintained as separate funds - namely, Sewer Fund, 
Water Fund, Electric Fund. 

FIDUCIARY FUNDS 

Trust and Agency Funds 

Trust and agency funds are used to account for assets held 
by the Town in a trustee capacity or as an agent for 
individuals, private organizations, other governments 
and/or other funds. These include expendable trust, non- 
expendable trust and agency funds. Nonexpendable trust 
funds are accounted for in a manner that permits the 
periodic measurement of revenues earned, expenses in- 
curred and/or net income in order to demonstrate main- 
tenance of capital. Expendable trust funds are accounted 
for in essentially the same manner as governmental funds. 
Agency funds are custodial in nature (assets equal liabilities) 
and do not involve measurement of results of operations. 

ACCOUNT GROUP 

Long-Term Debt and Liabilities - Long-Term liabilities expected 
to be financed from governmental funds are accumulated in 
the general long-term debt group of accounts. This account 
group is not a fund. It is only concerned with the 
measurement of finanacial position and therefore, is not 
involved with a measurement of the results from any operation. 

B. Basis of Accounting 

The accompanying financial statements, except for the 
enterprise funds as noted below, have been prepared prin- 
cipally on the modified accrual basis of accounting. This 
method recognizes revenues when they become measurable and 
available. Expenses are recognized under this method as 
they are incurred. 

The accompanying financial statements of the enterprise fund 
have been prepared and presented on the accrual basis of 
accounting. Under this method, revenues are recognized in 
the accounting period in which they are earned and expenses 
are recognized when the related liability is incurred. 



-84- 



Revenue Recognition 

Property tax revenues are recognized as revenue when they 
become available. Available means then due, or past due 
and receivable within the current period, or expected to be 
collected soon enough thereafter to be used to pay liabilities 
of the current period. 

All other revenues are recognized throughout the year when 
cash is received. Receipts during the sixty days 
immediately following the close of the fiscal year are also 
recognized as available revenue. 

In applying the susceptible to accrual concept to inter- 
governmental revenues, the legal and contractual re- 
quirements of the numerous individual programs are used 
as guidance. There are, however, essentially two types 
of these revenues. In one, monies must be expected on the 
specific purpose or project before any amounts will be paid 
to the Town, therefore, revenues are recognized based upon 
the expenditures recorded. In the other, monies are virt- 
ually unrestricted as to purpose of expenditure and are 
ususally revocable only for failure to comply with pre- 
scribed compliance requirements. These resources are re- 
flected as revenues at the time of receipt or earlier if the 
susceptible to accrual criteria is met. 

Expenses 

Expenditures are recorded during the year on a cash dis- 
bursement basis. In addition, as required by Massachusetts 
General Laws, disbursements made during the fifteen days 
immediately following the close of each fiscal year and 
which pertain to the prior year are recorded as expenses as 
of June 30th. 

Purchase orders outstanding at June 30th related to annual 
operating expenses are recorded as encumbrances and, accord- 
ingly, as a reservation of fund balances at that date. 

GAAP Basis Amounts - Property taxes on the combined state- 
ment of revenues and expenditures - budget and actual - 
general and revenue sharing funds (exhifeit 3) has been 
stated in accordance with interpretation number 3 issued by 
the National Council on Governmental Accounting. 

2. Departures from Generally Accepted Accounting Principles 

During 1981, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts issued a revised 
uniform municipal accounting system entitles "U.M.A.S." The de- 
partures from G.A.A.P. under this revised system have been 
significantly narrowed. The town has adopted the revised uniform 
municipal accounting system entitled U.M.A.S. since 1981. 



-85- 



The significant departures from G.A.A.P. included in the 
Town of Ipswich's financial statements are: 

A. Retirement benefits are provided for on a "pay-as-you 
go" basis rather than an acceptable actuarial cost 
method (note 8) . 

B. General fund fixed asset acquisitions are recorded as 
expenditures at the time purchases are made rather 
than being capitalized in a general fixed asset group 
of accounts. 

C. Purchases for materials and supplies inventories are 
recorded as expenditures rather than assets at the 
time of purchase. 

3. Deferred Revenue 

Property taxes and other revenues that are measurable but 
not available have been classified as deferred revenue on 
June 30, 1986 as follows: 

Outstanding property taxes June 30, 1987 (95,818.) 

Motor Vehicle, boat and farm excise 316,884. 

Tax Liens (35,736.) 
Departmentals 19,414. 

Total 204,744 

4. Provision for Property Tax Abatements and Exemptions 
Provision for property tax abatements and exemptions are 
established for each annual tax levy as prescribed by 
statue. The primary intent is to provide for these po- 
tential refunds or allowances during the year in which the 
tax would otherwise be due and collected. Excessive amounts 
no longer necessary are transferred to fund balance reserved 
for extraordinary or unforseen expenses as prescribed by the 
Massachusetts General Laws. 

5. Reserve for Extraordinary or Unforseen Expenses 

The balance in this account represents the transfer of 
excess amounts from the "Provision for Abatement and 
Exemption" accounts. This account was previously known or 
classified as "Overlay Surplus" to be appropriated by the 
town meeting vote for extraordinary or unforseen expenses in 
accordance with Chapter 59, Section 25, Massachusetts 
General Laws . 

6. Reserve for Encumbrances 

The balance in this account is made up of current and prior 
years unexpended appropriations carried forward. 

7. Unreserved Fund Balances - Designated 

Certain budgetary surplus and deficits must, according to 
the general Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, be 



-86- 



utilized to reduce or be raised in the next subsequent tax 
rate. These items have been included within the unreserved 
fund balance pursuant to G.A.A.P. but have been connoted as 
designated for identification purposes. These items include 
the following: 

State and County over 
(under) assessments $( 11,032 ) 

Total $ 11,032 

State and County over /underassessment , net, result from an 
excess of amounts raised in the tax levy of the current year 
as compared to the actual expenditures made for such purposes 
These amounts will be utilized to reduce the 1987 tax levy. 

Appropriation deficits resulted from expenditures of the 
accounts listed that exceed their appropriation during the 
fiscal year. 

8. Pension Plans 

Substantially, all employees of the Town, except school 
teachers and certain other school department employees 
are members of the Essex County Retirement System. The 
pension plan provides retirement benefits for members 
who have attained a certain age and for periods of 
service. Members contribute certain percentages of 
their salaries or wages to the plan. In addition, the 
Massachusetts Division of Insurance determined an 
amount, each year, that the Town must contribute to the 
system in order to meet that year's projected benefit 
payment . 

This so called "pay-as-you-go" method does not provide 
for the funding of any unfunded liabilities that might 
exist as a result of an actuarial determination of the 
fiscal condition of the plan. The amount of the un- 
funded liability of the Essex County Retirement System 
is actuarialy determined periodically and reported to 
the Town by the Massachusetts Retirement Law Commission. 
The most recent actuarial valuation was prepared as of 
January 01, 1979. At the date, the actuarialy computed 
value of unfunded pension benefits attributable to the 
Town of Ipswich amounted to $5,856,650. 

Teachers and certain administrative employees of the 
School Department participate in a contributory retire- 
ment plan administered by the Massachusetts Teachers' 
Retirement Board. The Town does not contribute to this 
plan. 



-87- 



9. Unemployment Compensation 

The Town is on the reimbursable method for paying unem- 
ployment compensation. Under the reimbursable method, the 
Massachusetts Employment Security Division sends a list 
quarterly to the community of who has received benefits. 
The community then reimburses the Massachusetts Employ- 
ment Security Division for these claims against the Town. 

10. Workmen's Compensation 

The Town insures its workers with Utica National Insurance 
Company, which computed its premium by estimating the Town's 
payroll and utilizing the rates per hundred established by 
the State Division of Insurance. 

11. Vacation and Sick Pay 

Employees earn vacation and sick leave as they provide 
services. Vacation accumulation is limited to the current 
year. Sick leave accumulates for various groups of em- 
ployees based upon the respective collection bargaining 
agreements. Sick leave accumulates at the rate of one and 
one-quarter days per month. Maximum sick leave accumulation 
is 150 days for firefighters, 165 days for policemen, and 
165 days for all other town employees. The cost of vacation 
and sick leave benefits is accounted for as an operation 
expenditure of the general fund, when paid. Sick leave 
benefits are paid only when taken and, therefore, not paid 
to employees upon termination. The accumulated sick leave 
benefits on June 30, 1987 have not been determined. 

12. Summary of Long-Term Debt 

A summary of the Long-Term Debt is presented below: 



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1— 1 

1 




H 


H 


H 


O 


H 


o 


• 


SS 


< 


< 


CO 


H 


< 


u 


H 


O 


■z 


Z 




O 


H 




<: 








w 


S3 


CO 


X 


z 


PC 


• 


• 


H 


H 




pj 


• 


CO 


H 


H 


<u 


r-1 


Jh 


CO 


H 


<J 


CO 


CO 


H 


Pi 


< 


CO 


CO 


o 


rH 


rH 


CO 


33 


PQ 


W 


rH 



CO 

• H 
Pm a 
PJ pj 
Q S 



to <3 
W 

H W 

<: co 

M S 

Pm CJ 

M pi 

H PD 

Pi Pm 

W PJ 

CJ Pi 





^O 


. — 1 


r~~ 




en 


in 


m 




in 


oo 


CO 




st 


1 — 1 


m 




. — i 


CN 


00 




ft 


n 


M 




in 


OO 


-* 




r— 1 


r^ 


i— 1 

o 

00 

PC 
CO 

<S 






2 


o 






O 








H 


CO 


• • 


H 


H 


•- 


H 


H 


< 


Pi 


CO 


CO 


H 


w 


P3 


O 


U 


pi 


Pi 


P-, 


w 


P3 


H 


w 


Pi 


CO 




p. 


Pm 


•ad 


2: 




w 


w 


o 


Pi 


Q 


pi 


H 


pj 




H 


CJ 


H 


Q 




2; 


w 


hJ 


rJ 


H 


s 


W 


<3 


►J 






H 


Pi 






O 


<^ 






H 



o 

H 






o 

w w 
pi pa 

H 
Pm 
O Pi 

O 
W Pm 

rJ 

PP» 
Q 
PJ 
PC 
O 
CO 



rJ 




S 




w 




S25 




w 




CO 


CO 




PJ 


CO 


o 


H 


§ 


2; 


r-1 


<^ 


<: 


H 


PQ 


Z 




P3 


Pi 


O 


PJ 


CJ 


o 


CJ 


o 


< 


PJ 




h-l 


§ 




o 




H 





o 


vo 


^O 


CN 


ON 


^r 


ON 


en 


en 


00 


00 


CN 


■<r 


o 


on 


>X> 


en 


i*-. 


<r 


o 


<t 


o> 


CTn 


00 


<r 


r>. 


o 


vO O 


m 


-cr 


. — i 


m 


00 


vD 


in 


en 


CN 


oo 


r^- 


o 


CT> I 


i — i 


m 


i — i 


. — i 


<* 


^D 


00 


CTn 


O 


vO 


O 


vO 


CTi 


^o 


o 


en 


en 


c^ 


rH 


en 


CTN 


CN 


■ — i 


<r 




* 


n 


•t 


m 


•V 


*v 


ft 


* 


* 


ft 


•% 


ft 




oo 


o 


o 


<T) 


Csl 


so 


n 


a> 


o 


CN 


m 


r^ 




r- 


r^- 


o 


• — 1 


o 


St 


CN 


vO 


vO 


■ — I 


^— <• 


i— i 




vO 


CM 


<r 


00 


1— 1 




i»> 


CN 








O 


«e- 


V — ' 


<r 




rH 








rH 








00 





Q 




H 






CO 










S~ N 








^ 


CO 


CO 




/ K 


CO 










CO 








P3 


H 


O 




• 


PJ 










Q 








Pm 


pj 


PM 
PJ 




o 


CO 
CO 










J3 

P3 •• 








rJ 


g 


Q 


/• V 


Pi 


< 


r~N 


/- — s 






Pm CO 








2 


pj 




CO 


Ph 




Pi 


pi 






S 




PC 




w 


Pm 


H 




• 


pj 


pj 


• — s 


^— s 


H PJ 




CO 




PJ 


pi 


O 


S3 


• 


a 


^s 


H 


Q 


Q 


CO H 




< 




a 


O 




a 


Ph 


PJ 


pj 


<J 


rJ 


rJ 


P3 rH 




u 


Q 


PJ 


<tj 


CO 


<: 


Ph 


CO 


ES 


PJ 


PJ 


Pi 


PJ 




g 


O 


PJ 


PJ 

H 


o 


u 


CO 










H CJ 


o 


H 


PC 




CO 


< 
















rH 


CJ 


CJ 




O 


g 


U 


O 


o 


o 


CJ 


o 


CJ 




O rJ 


S3 


CJ 


a 


53 


rH 


S3 


2 


S3 


S3 


2 


2 


CO 


S3 M 


h-t 


< 


o 


H 


O 


Pm 


H I 


H 


H 


H 


H 


rM 


o 


M CJ 








W 


oi 


H 


M 


M 


U6 


« 


« 


M 


z 


fci S3 


Q 


rH 


PC 


U 


P=> 


H 


CJ 


CJ) 


CJ 


a 


CJ 


CJ 


H 


CJ o 


(J 


< 


CO 


PJ 


PM 


Pi 


PJ 


pj 


PJ 


pj 


PJ 


PJ 


> 


PJ CJ 


PJ 


H 


<c 


PC 


pj 


PJ 


PC 


PC 


PC 


PC 


PC 


PC 


<^ 


PC PJ 




o 


o 


u 


Pi 


u 


U 


CJ 


CJ 


CJ 


CJ 


CJ 


CO 


cj pi 




H 



r^- 


r*» 


p- 4 


m 


• 


#i 


St 


m 


in 


m 


n 


oo 


* 


•« 


CM 


<r 


^-^ 


rH 




O 




A 




oo 



CO 

ss <3 
pj pj 
PJ Pi 

E2 H 



H 
PJ 
PQ 

PJ 
CJ 



H 
CJ 
CJ 

< 



-89- 



SUMMARY 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
PUBLIC SAFETY 
EDUCATION 
PUBLIC WORKS 
SANITATION 

MISCELLANEOUS BEPTARTMENTS 
DEBT SERVICE 
GRAND TOTAL 



TOWN OF IPSWICH SCHEDULE I 

DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1987 
GENERAL FUND 

ENCUMBRANCE APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES ENCUMBRANCE 

FROM FISCAL FISCAL YEAR TRANSFERS FISCAL YEAR TO FISCAL OVERDRAWN SURPLUS 
YEAR 1986 1987 IN (OUT) 1987 YEAR 1988 APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATE 



$8,883.00 $1,401,734.00 $596,880.00 $1,895,000.00 $34,880.00 
7,948.00 1,523,357.00 182.00 1,444,784.00 8,393.00 

963.00 5,965,173.00 127,619.00 

673,953.00 

133,888.00 

2,675.00 652,829.00 

284,517.00 



22,204.00 6,100,000.00 

1,679.00 632,358.00 

133,388.00 

6,773.00 730,577.00 

311,222.00 



$0.00 $77, 557. ( 

77, 810. C 

30,375.(' 

2i,676.00 (76,325.00) 14, 733. ( 



22,763.00 



$47,487.00 10,833,136. $600,640.00 $11,050,144.1 



64, 433. C 
26, 705. C 
$215,831.00 ($76,325.00) $291, 613. C 1 



-90- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR END INS JUNE 30, 1967 
GENERAL FUND 



SCHEDULE II 





ENCUMBRANCE 


APPROPRIATION 




EXPENDITURES 


ENCUMBRANCE 






FROM f 


'ISCAL 


FISCAL YEAR 


TRANSFERS 


FISCAL YEAR 


TO FISCAL 


OVERDRAWN SURPLUS 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


YEAR 


1986 


1987 


IN (OUT) 


1987 


YEAR 1988 


APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION 


;CTHEN-SAL ARIES 


$ 


0. 


$14,150.00 


$ 0. 


$13,044.00 


$ 0. 


$ 0. $1,106.00 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 




0. 


2,170=00 


1,634.00 


3,644.00 




160.00 


I MANAGER-SALARIES 






83,445,00 


246.00 


83,691,00 




— 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 




0. 


20,564.00 


0. 


17,391,00 


655.00 


2,518.00 


•CONSULTANT 






10,000.00 


2,576.00 


12,576,00 






-IRATOR-SALARY 






100.00 




100,00 






•EXPENSE, GENERAL 






10.00 








10.00 


:0M-WABES 






50.00 








50,00 


•EXPENSES GENERAL 






2,650,00 


0, 


2,588,00 




62.00 


•RESERVE FUND 






45,000.00 


{29,568.00) 






15,432.00 


:T I ON /REG 1 3 TR AT I ON-S AL AR I ES 






12,177.00 


2,065,00 


14,242.00 






•EXPENSE, GENERAL 






&, 148,00 




6,014,00 




2,134.00 


1UNTANT-SALARIES 




0. 


92,580.00 


383.00 


92,904.00 




59.00 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 




0. 


38,494.00 


0. 


32,421.00 


606,00 


5,467.00 


•OUTLAY 




0. 






0, 






."SSORS-SALARIES 






73,619.00 


0, 


73,339.00 




£80.00 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 






8,879.00 


0. 


8,761.00 




118.00 


iSURER/COLLECTGR-SALARIES 






94,646,00 




86,735.00 




7,911,00 


•EXPENSE, 6ENERAL 






13,107.00 


0. 


10,865.00 




2,242.00 


i CLERK-SALARIES 






36,500,00 




36,454.00 




46.00 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 






2,325.00 




2,088.00 




237.00 


-OUTLAY 






0. 








0. 


^-SALARIES 






10,000.00 




10,000.00 






-EXPENSE 






1,460.00 


737,00 


2,197.00 




0. 


-LITIGATION 






16,000.00 


4,143.00 


20,143.00 






RD OF APPEALS-SALARIES 






1,500.00 


9, 


1,325.00 




175.00 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 






374.00 




354,00 




20.00 


-OUTLAY 






0. 




0. 




0. 


NNING BOARD-SALARIES 






41,440,00 




32,094.00 




9,346.00 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 






2,740.00 


0. 


S, 397.00 


343,00 


0. 


-OUTLAY 






0. 




0. 




0. 


-CONSULTANT 






500.00 


0. 


0. 




500.00 


TER PLAN COMMONWEALTH 


8 


160.00 


8,800.00 


55.00 


9,021.00 


0. 


7,994.00 


TOTAL PAGE 1 


$3 


160.00 


$641,428.00 


($17,729.00) 


$574,388.00 


$1,604.00 


$0.00 $55,867.00 



-91- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30,1987 
SENERAL FUND 



ENCUMBRANCE APPROPRIATION 



EXPENDITURES ENCUMBRANCE 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


FROM FISCAL 


FISCAL YEAR 


TRANSFERS 


FISCAL YEAR 


TO FISCAL 


OVERDRAW* 


1 


SURPLUS 


(CONTINUED) 


YEAR 


1986 


1987 


IN (OUT) 


1987 


YEAR 1988 


APPR0PRIAT1 


[HI 


APPRGPRIATI 


TOWN HALL-SALARIES 




$0.00 


$16,927.00 


$0,00 


$16,868.00 


$0.00 


10. 


00 


$59. 


-EXPENSE, GENERAL 






18,570.00 


. 00 


11,388.00 


1,107.00 






5,575. 


-OUTLAY 






2,700.00 


1,000,00 


3,561.00 








139. 


-ENERGY 






8,000.00 




6,294.00 








1,706. 


HISC FINANCE-AUDIT 






20,000.00 


2,500.00 




3P z.M\ nn 








ESSEX RETIREMENT 






309,028.00 


227,436.00 


525,864.00 








10.600. 


MEDIC, MEDICARE 




500.00 


6,900.00 


3,930.00 


11,035.00 








295. 


WORKMAN'S COMPENSATION 




0.00 


55,161.00 


55,355.00 


109,516.00 


1,000.00 






0. 


UNEHPLOYHENT 






6,200.00 


620.00 


6,820.00 










VETERANS PENSIONS 






14,5*0.00 




10,916.00 


3,624.00 






0. 


HEALTH INSURANCE 






116,660.00 


167,640.00 


279,255.00 


5,0*5,00 








LIFE INSURANCE 






QQC ft a 


1,612.00 


2,065.00 








1,332. 


INSURANCE EXPENSE 






166,435.00 


152,936.00 


318,309.00 








1,112. 


OFFICE EQUIPMENT 




283.00 


4,800.00 


534 


5,235,00 


. 00 






322. 


POSTAGE 






12,000.00 


986.00 


12,936.00 










SUBTOTAL PA6E 2 




723.00 


760,306.00 


614,549.00 


1,320,612.00 


23,276.00 


0. 


00 


21,690. 


SUBTOTAL PAGE i 


8 


160.00 


641,428.00 


(17,729.00) 


574,383.00 


1,604,00 
$34,360.00 


0. 


;";:'} 


55,867. 


TOTAL SENERAL GOVERNMENT 


$8 


883.00 


$1,401,734.00 


?J70 , DCV . '.".' 


$1,895,000.00 


$0. 


00 


$77,557, 



-92- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDIN6 JUNE 30, 1987 
GENERAL FUND 



SCHEDULE II 



public safety 

:ce- 

jalaries/wases 
[xpense general 

IUTLAY 

:nergy SUPPLIES 

OTAL POLICE 



jalaries/wa6es 

:kpense, general 

IUTLAY 

;nersy supplies 
iiscellaneous-training 

otal fire 



ENCUMBRANCE APPROPRIATION EXPENDITURES ENCUMBRANCE 

FROM FISCAL FISCAL YEAR TRANSFERS FISCAL YEAR TO FISCAL OVERDRAWN SURPLUS 
YEAR 1986 19S7 IN (OUT; 1987 YEAR 1988 APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION 



$227.00 


$712,703.00 


$0.00 


$688,146.00 


$0.00 


200.00 


20,318.00 


57.00 


20,375.00 


. 00 


834.00 


27,675.00 
34,710.00 




28,488.00 
30,567.00 




1,261.00 


795,411.00 


57.00 


767,576.00 


0.00 


5,807.00 


440,482.00 

37,119.00 

13,180.00 

4,701.00 

1,700.00 


125.00 


423,402.00 

35,016.00 

12,871.00 

4,047.00 

921.00 


0.00 



$0.00 



,807.00 497,182.00 



125.00 459,011.00 



2,986.94 



$24,789.00 

200.00 

21.00 

4,143.00 

29,153.00 



23,012.00 

2,103,00 

309.00 

654.00 

779.00 

21,668.28 



STRY- 

ALARIES/WA6ES 

XPENSE, GENERAL 

IUTLAY 

NER6Y SUPPLIES 

OTAL FORESTRY 

lORHASTER- 
iALARIES/WAGES 
XPENSE, GENERAL 
IUTLAY 

:nergy 



160.00 

75.00 

245.00 



63,597.00 

28,504.00 

5,600.00 

2,601.00 

100,302.00 



19,451.00 

5,310.00 

850.00 

1,225.00 



0.00 



60,461.00 




20,889.00 


7,440.00 


4,025.00 


1,300.00 


2,227.00 





87,602.00 8,740.00 



11,714.00 

4,941.00 

768.00 

439.00 



0.00 
0.00 



'OTAL HARBORMASTER 


480.00 


26,836.00 


0.00 


17,862.00 


0.00 


IFISH INSPECTOR- 












SALARIES/ WAGES 




27,851.00 




25,651.00 




EXPENSE, GENERAL 




4,845.00 




747.00 


153.00 


ENERGY 




712.00 




677.00 




CONSULTANT 

TOTAL SHELLFISH INSPECTOR 




1,000.00 




792.00 




34,403.00 


27,867.00 


153.00 



3,136.00 
175.00 
225.00 
374.00 

3,960.00 



7,897.00 
444.00 
327.00 
786.00 

9,454.00 



2,200.00 

3,945.00 

35.00 

208.00 

6,386.00 



TOTAL PAGE 1 



$7,548.00 $1,454,139.00 



$182.00 $1,377,164.00 $8,893.00 



$0.00 $75,812.00 



-93- 



PUBLIC SAFETY 
(CONTINUED) 

BUILDING INSPECTOR- 
SALARIES 
EXPENSE GENERAL 
OUTLAY 

SUBTOTAL BUILDING INSPECTOR 

CIVIL DEFENSE- 
SALARIES 

EXPENSE, GENERAL 
ENERGY 

SUBTOTAL CIVIL DEFENSE 

DOG OFFICER- 
SALARIES 

EXPENSE, GENERAL 
ENERGY & OUTLAY 

SUBTOTAL DOG OFFICER 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 

DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1987 
GENERAL FUND 



SCHEDULE I 



ENCUMBRANCE APPROPRIATION 
FROM FISCAL FISCAL YEAR- 
YEAR 1936 1937 



$0.00 $37,593.00 

0.00 3,530.00 

600.00 

0.00 41,723.00 



250.00 



250.00 



150.00 



2,400.00 

1,950.00 

96.00 



4,446.00 



17,000.00 
4,532.00 
1,517.00 



EXPENDITURES ENCUMBRANCE 
TRANSFERS FISCAL YEAR TO FISCAL OVERDRAWN SURPLUS 
IN (OUT) 1937 YEAR 1963 APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATE 



$0.00 



0.00 



150.00 23,049.00 



$36,938.00 

3,386.00 
599.00 

40,923.00 



2,400.00 

1,946.00 

23.00 

4,369.00 



17,150.00 
3,891.00 
1.287.00 

22,328.00 



$0.00 



0.00 



. Oil 



$0.00 



$655.0 

144.0 

1.0 



800.0 



254.0 
73.0 

327.0 



0,0 

641.0 
230,0 

871.0 



SUBTOTAL PAGE 2 
SUBTOTAL PAGE 1 
TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 



400.00 69,213.00 

7,548.00 1,454,139.00 

$7,948.00 $1,523,357.00 



0.00 67,620.00 0.00 

182.00 1,377,164.00 8,893.00 

$182.00 $1,444,784.00 $8,893.00 



0,00 
0.00 



1,998.0 



i, 812.0 



$0.00 $77,810.0 



-94- 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 198? 
GENERAL FUND 



:hedule ii 



EDUCATIONAL 


ENCUMBRANCE 

FROM FISCAL 

YEAR 1986 


APPROPRIATION 

FISCAL YEAR 

1987 


TRANSFERS 
IN (CUT) 


EX 

FI 


PENDITURES 
SCAL YEAR 
1987 


ENCUMBRANCE 
TO FISCAL 
YEAR 1938 


OVERDRAW SURPLUS 
APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION 


^oTRUCTION- 
SALARIES 
EKPENSE, GENERAL 


$2,472.00 $2,329,^0.00 
1,67^.00 569,290,00 


($62,401,00) 
5.00 


$2 


,754,326.00 
557,207.00 


$11,065.00 
9,130.00 


$0.00 


$4,090.00 
4,632.00 


rilKNT, SUPPORT SERVICE- 
SALARIES 
EKPENSE, GENERAL 


2,434,00 
1,877.00 


450,959.00 
64,841.00 


641.00 
5,901.00 




452,095.00 
63 , 308 , 00 


1,939.00 
7,434.00 




0,00 
1,877.00 


:AFF, SUPPORT SERVICE- 
SALARIES 
EKPENSE, GENERAL 


4,418.00 
999 . 00 


162,761.00 
72,966.00 


11,913.00 
110.00 




178,559.00 
70,323.00 


0.00 
1,922.00 




533.00 
1,830,00 


MINISTRATION- 
SALARIES 
EKPENSE, GENERAL 


531,00 
1,702.00 


877,108,00 
171,271.00 


(102,886.00) 
31,196.00 




768,810.00 
136,341.00 


0.00 
16,126.00 




5,9^3.00 
1,702.00 


'ERATIQNS/MAINTAINANCE- 
SALARIES 
EKPENSE. GENERAL 


1,676.00 
3,988.00 


204,644.00 
310,717,00 


34,126,00 
i21,035.00) 




235,835.00 
272,694,00 


0.00 
15,990.00 




4,561,00 
4,986.00 


WWP3RTAT ION- 
SALARIES 
EX-ENSE, GENERAL 


24:4.00 
139.00 


39,930.00 
216,995.00 


5,617,00 
21,035.00 




45, "91.00 
222,055.00 


0.00 
15,975.00 




189.00 


-FE'tRIA- 
SAL ARIES 
EKPENSE, GENERAL 




9,720.00 
6,000.00 


1 ,500,00 
11 ,993.00 




11,188.00 
17,993.00 






32.00 


IKED ASSETS- 
EXPENSE 

IKED CHARGES-EXPENSE 


0.00 


41,200.00 
72,186.00 


63,248,00 




56,410.00 

72,188.00 


48,038.00 






CTAL EDUCATIONAL . 


$22,204.00 


$6,100,000.00 


$963.00 


$5 


,965,173.00 


$127,619.00 


$0.00 


$30,375,00 



-95- 



PUBLIC WORKS 

PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION- 
SALARIES 

EXPENSE, ADMINISTRATION 
OUTLAY 

HIGHWAY- 

SALARIES/WABES 

EXPENSE, GENERAL 

OUTLAY 

ROAD TREATMENT 



TOWN OF IPSWICH 
DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR EHDINS JU^E 30, 1987 
GENERAL FUND 



SCHEDULE 



ENCUMBRANCE APPROPRIATION 
FROM FISCAL FISCAL YEAR 
YEAR 1986 19B7 



$0.00 



fM,9*3.00 
1,545.00 

210.00 



1,379.00 146,130.00 

300.00 145,302.00 

8,000.00 

150,000.00 



EXPENDITURES 
TRANSFERS FISCAL YEAR 
IN (OUT) 1987 



$0.00 



ENCUMBRANCE 

TO FISCAL OVERDRAWN SURPLUS 
YEAR 1988 APPROPRIATION APPROPRIAT 



$44,918.00 

1,508.00 

206.00 



140,922.00 

128,340.00 

7,997.00 

149,995.00 



$0.00 



5,0d6.00 



$0.00 



$25 

37 

4 



6,587, 
2,236 



SNOW ;i ICE REHOVAL- 
SALARIES/WASES 
EXPENSE, GENERAL 
ENERGY 
MISCELLANEOUS EXPENSE 



15,000.00 

39,875.00 

3,500.00 

12,000.00 



35,750.00 

79,754.00 

4,247.00 

26,949.00 



(20,750.00) 

(39,879.00) 

(747.00) 

(14,949.00) 



0. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTAINANCE 
SALARIES/WAGES 
EXPENSE, GENERAL 
OUTLAY 
ENERGY 



0.00 



24,056.00 

32,735.00 

0.00 

9,062.00 



0.00 



23,613.00 

23,300.00 

0.00 

6,454.00 



6,650.00 



443. 

2,785. 

0. 

2,608. 



TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 



$1,679.00 $632,358.00 



$0.00 $673,953.00 $21,676.00 ($76,325.00) $14,733 



TOTAL SANITATION 



$0.00 $133,383.00 



$0.00 $133,388.00 



$0.00 



$0.00 



$0. 



-96- 



TOUN OF IPSWICH 
DETAILED APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1967 
GENERAL FUND 



SCHEDULE II 





ENCUMBRANCE 


APPROPRIATION 




EXPENDITURES 


ENCUMBRANCE 








FROM FISCAL 


FISCAL YEAR 


TRANSFERS 


FISCAL YEAR 


TO FISCAL 


OVERDRAW 


SURPLUS 


5CELLANE0US DEPARTMENTS 


YEAR 1986 


1987 


IN (OUT) 


1987 


YEAR 1988 


APPROPRIATION APPROPRIATION 


5T0RICAL EXPENSE 


$0.00 


$1,000.00 


$0.00 


$226.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$774.00 


ISERVATION-SALARY 




1,200.00 




1,200.00 






0.00 


EXPENSE 


0.00 


700.00 




337.00 






313.00 


OUTLAY 




1,150.00 




1,134.00 






16.00 


1LTH-SALARIES 


0.00 


54,596.00 


0.00 


54,305.00 






291.00 


-EXPENSE 




86,729.00 


2,389.00 


70,395.00 


18,723.00 




0.00 


-OUTLAY 




1,130.00 


36.00 


1,166.00 






0.00 


JNCIL-ON-AGING-SALARY 




8,400.00 


0.00 


7,775.00 






625.00 


-EXPENSE 




19,564.00 


0.00 


19,194.00 






370.00 


fRANS-EXPENSE 


5,100.00 


95,000.00 


0.00 


55,235.00 


1,700.00 




43,165.00 


1ETERY/PARKS-SALARY 


326.00 


148,077.00 


0.00 


137,672.00 


0.00 




10,731.00 


-EXPENSE 




19,096.00 


0.00 


18,311.00 


602.00 




183.00 


-OUTLAY 




21,200.00 




18,442.00 


230.00 




2,528.00 


-ENERGY 




7,349.00 




6,016.00 






1,333.00 


JRARY-SALARIES 


76.00 


123,747.00 




123,639.00 


0.00 




184.00 


-EXPENSE 


228.00 


53,408.00 


0,00 


52,456.00 


494.00 




686.00 


-OUTLAY 


0.00 


19,550.00 




18,482.00 


852.00 




216.00 


-ENERGY 




1,640.00 




1,245.00 






395.00 


;reation-salaries 


822.00 


46,973.00 




46,154.00 


0.00 




1,641.00 


-EXPENSE 


221.00 


17,424.00 


250.00 


17,063.00 


162.00 




670.00 


-ENERGY & OUTLAY 




2,644.00 




2,332.00 






312.00 


rftL MISCELLANECUS DEFT ! S 


$6,773.00 


$730,577.00 


$2,675.00 


$652,829.00 


$22,763.00 


$0.00 


$64,433.00 



3T SERVICE 



FURING DEBT-PRINCIPAL 
FEREST ON DEBT 

FAL DEBT SERVICE 



$0.00 $285,031.00 
26,191.00 



$0.00 $311,222.00 



$0.00 



$265,000.00 
19,517.00 



$0.00 $284,517.1 



$0.00 



$0.00 



$0.00 $20,031.00 
6,674,00 



$0.00 $26,705.00 



-97- 



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-98- 



353-105 ^ 



IPSWICH PUBLIC LIBRARY 

3 2122 00162 135 "2 



PRINTING & BINDING BY 

ROWLEY PRINTING, INC. 

ROWLEY, MASS.